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Korren

Testers
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  1. Like
    Korren reacted to PopeUrban in Crowfall Using Unity 5   
    Unity is a great platform. I use it at work. It tends to get a bad rep because its plugin interface makes it very easy to slap together a lot of really unoptimized components in to a game, and the vast majority of games developed on the platform are exactly that, poorly optimized stuff that should still be considered functional prototypes.
     
    However, it's also quite easy to tie unity components in to external libraries and add all sorts of logic that doesn't rely on it. Until the lighting updates in 5 its default redering and lighting engine had a lot lacking (then again, there were already a lot of great thrid party lighting setups that improved that greatly.)
     
    The primary benefit of choosing unity for a project is that it is the architecture of the engine itself is built around very clean object oriented principles, treating every object by default as just "object" allows for a really freeform way to do stuff.
     
    For instance, when I was working in unreal, it was a real pain to do stuff like instantiate a player model with associated sound effects, particle effects, sound, etc. wheras in unity the way object inheritence works it's pretty easy to cache extremely complex constructs of any type and instantiate them on the fly.
     
    It makes it easier to create "Thing with all the logic and effects" and re-use that than most other engines that have a harder split which requires first defining a lot of limitations for classes like "weapon, armor, etc." as the component architecture allows packages of code to be dynamically assigned to ojects, modified, moved around, etc. in real time.
  2. Like
    Korren reacted to M0rdred in Trade In Campaigns   
    (This post is about trade in campaigns, NOT in the Eternal Kingdoms... that is a whole other problem)
     
    First off let me start by saying that trade is vital- especially in a PvP heavy game. The important thing, however, it to ensure it is implemented right. Some games completely switched me off because of people standing in the streets shouting "Want To Buy!" or "Want To Sell!" It creates spam, it opens up scams and provides absolutely no ease of use for either merchants nor the end user.
     

     
    A properly realised trade system provides something concrete to fight for. Resources are sent to crafters, who turn them into weapons, which are used to secure more resources. This process has a number of vulnerabilities - the resource collection, transport, the crafting location and the sale.
     
    Summary;
    Resource points that can be controlled and raided.
    Logistics which can be intercepted.
    Workshops that can be destroyed.
    Points of sale which are player controlled and regulated.
    Items which are actually useful, and valuable.
     
    Resource Collection
    We already know that Crowfall has resource collection, be it though mines, mills and other such structures or PvE combat against NPC creatures. These are viable targets, and control of these assets will provide a significant strategic and economic edge.
     
    Logistics
    Once the resources have been secured, they need to be moved to where the crafters are. To do this, adventurers would have to grab the goods and run them back to their base. This is however extremely boring, so why not automate it?
     
    Introducing; the Outpost.
     
    An Outpost is basically a structure which allows a caravan network to be created (yes, this will require us to reach that stretch goal!) Outposts, spawn and send caravans to Marketplaces, moving goods from point A to point B.
     
    Each Outpost is linked to a marketplace, and it will send goods to that marketplace (a one-way journey).
     
    An outpost can be built;
    Near a mine or other resource structure to automatically siphon goods off, and load Caravans. In the middle of no-where, to send goods from favoured hunting grounds back to town. Once a certain level of goods have been stockpiled, a caravan is spawned and heads off to the Marketplace. Caravans do appear in the game, and can be attacked. I would suggest that NPC guards can be hired to protect them (to deter solo-attackers), but this should of course come with a fee.
     
    Likewise outposts should be able to hire guards, but are otherwise destructible. Any items contained in their inventory can be looted.
     
    Workshops
    So, Players are now in possession of resources, but they now need to refine those materials into items that are of actual use. Workshops are buildings that can be built anywhere, but will require protection as they will not come with guards or anything of their own. Unlike Outposts, they are not a frontier building. Workshops should also be upgradable, with higher tier machines and stations required to fashion better equipment. Therefore, a real financial investment is required to make the best items - and that investment has to be protected as it is otherwise vulnerable.
     

     
    Marketplaces
    Marketplaces are the final element which ties the whole system together. These are the targets of the Caravans, they are limited warehouses to store goods and they are the final point of sale to other players. Marketplaces can house one or more merchants, each with a limited capacity (quantity and different number of items) of what they can sell. Marketplaces can be upgraded in order to increase merchant capacity, increase storage and increase the number of Outposts which can service it.
     
    The interface for sales should be quite in depth however, with proper search and filter functionality and not just a massive list as this helps no-body. Marketplaces can list any item found in the game that can be stored in an inventory. This means weapons, armour, jewelry, deeds and blueprints, stone, timber and any other resource.
     
    Marketplace owners can decide who may list items with their merchants, and set a tariff on goods sold (so the owner can make profit from other people's sales). These tariffs should be variable, so for example, guild members can have a lower sales tariff. Marketplaces can spawn and send caravans to any other Marketplace. This has to be done from the point of sale  (ie, no distance selling), and of course the caravan is vulnerable to attack!
     
    Once again, Marketplaces are themselves vulnerable and need to be defended. If one is destroyed, then all goods held in storage, or by the merchants can be looted! Shipping all that loot however, would pose its own logistical problem...
     
    Items which are actually useful and valuable
    This should really speak for itself, but top end crafters need to be rewarded for their work with the potential for some very tidy profits. They do live in a dangerous world after all...
     
    Conclusion
    I have played a lot of MMOs, trading games, strategy games, whatever. Some with excellent trade systems (Eve Online), some with terrible ones (Darkfall... at release). Economics gives people something to fight for, a reason to combat. It gives all that conflict meaning. Adventurers fight over resources, which are sold to crafters, who fashion the tools needed by those warriors to keep the battles going. It's a symbiotic relationship, and each needs the other to survive.
     
    (Images taken from google, and all belong to their respective owners)
  3. Like
    Korren got a reaction from rhone in Physics For Cloth And Hair   
    Hmm, this is an interesting question. I would love to see cloth / hair physics to help bring the world alive instead of the static / pre-animated models we generally get in a lot of games.
  4. Like
    Korren got a reaction from tepid in Concerning Character Creation Customization (Alliteration Ftw)   
    That is a reasonable fear. I do hope that there is enough time / energy put into the character customization to make them semi-unique beyond armor appearance. I'm not too concerned that ACE will drop the ball on this, but I am interested in what they'll showcase regarding this.
  5. Like
    Korren reacted to thomasblair in My Issue With Certain Tera Combat Mechanics   
    This is the video that has been going around our office: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RGzzS1jGJc
     
    He does a really good job defining how the various games work.
  6. Like
    Korren got a reaction from mythx in Let's Talk About: Campaign Permanence   
    I'll admit, the idea of previously exported goods not having an impact on future campaigns is my concern. I understand part of the design / appeal is that players are dropped into the world on (relatively) even ground, but I still feel that there should be some carryover. Whether it is items that you can equip after a certain point (ie: bring your Sword of Mediocrity with you, but you can't use it for 24 hrs (or something)) at least it will give us in-campaign value of participating in campaigns. But, that is just my opinion.
  7. Like
    Korren got a reaction from Remlap in Where Are The Coders?   
    LOD will help, as it can apply to models, Physx, and FX, but I am still curious to know what should be attainable, even at a pre-alpha stage.
     
    So yes, I can agree with you that it is somewhat concerning if they only have a few programmers. Hopefully there are a few more lurking in the background somewhere coding furiously.
  8. Like
    Korren got a reaction from panpear in Let's Talk About: Campaign Permanence   
    I really can't argue with that. It will undoubtedly become more apparent and start to 'click' as the builds start rolling out. Having multiple campaigns with different rulesets will, at the very least, give players a chance to jump into something different than what they are used to, which I think is a great notion. 
  9. Like
    Korren reacted to jtoddcoleman in Let's Talk About: Campaign Permanence   
    This is why I feel it is important to have different Import restrictions on different Campaigns: some people will feel strongly about starting clean, others will feel strongly about carrying over some rewards.
     
    I don't have a feeling for the % of players who will fall to one side or the other on that spectrum, but luckily, I don't have to.  We'll watch the Campaigns to see which are more popular, and let the good one multiply and the weak ones die off.  Survival of the fittest.
     
    Todd
  10. Like
    Korren reacted to Remlap in Where Are The Coders?   
    Which is why it concerns me they only have about 5/6 programmers. It's not about how many players they are aiming for, but rather how many players are going to do. If you look at the most notable examples we have with Darkfall & Shadowbane there were hundreds of players in sieges, and generally performance issues to go with it. It's unavoidable to some degree when you have that many people in one area, but there are things you can do to avoid it.
     
    But couple hundreds of players with state of the art particle systems run by Physx for example, and rather quickly lag becomes and issue even on rather robust systems. Even going by strategy game standards, at any time you have hundreds of units in the game. Which is why there is quite a bit of LOD's (level of detail, basically objects far away are low poly) for when you aren't rendering right next to units. Unity has LOD built in, but how will voxel farm integrate with that? This is why it worries me when we can only see a handful of programmers on the project.
  11. Like
    Korren got a reaction from Remlap in Where Are The Coders?   
    I would not argue about adding additional programmers. And yes, the Unity engine is good about hashing out the base idea quickly, but takes a fair amount of time to refine and optimize (like any engine). The topic of programmers has brought a question to mind though which is: how many players on screen is Crowfall aiming for? Since PvP is such a core focus of the game, I'd honestly be worried about incurring crippling lag between the destructible terrain, effects, and raw number of models running around.
  12. Like
    Korren reacted to Psyentific in Goodposting 101: Keeping Forums Clean   
    Or: How I learned to stop worrying and love the Edit

    Since the Kickstarter is a big success, we're going to be looking at a wave of people coming in. Either those like myself who have only recently joined, prospective backers, or just new members overall. With that in mind, I've prepared a handful of guidelines, so that we can all keep the fairly high average post quality we've got right now.

    1. If it's worth posting, it's worth taking the time to post well. You could have the best ideas in the world, but if it's this poorly formatted mess nobody's going to read it. One concept per sentence, one theme per paragraph. If you're getting into super-long posting, try breaking it up with some images.

    2. Before you hit "Post", ask yourself "Does this improve on silence?". If the answer is not "Yes", put a few more minutes into it. Likewise, read your post before you post it; not only will you catch errors, you'll improve overall readability.

    3. Inform yourself. This doesn't necessarily mean reading the whole thread before replying; Just try and know what people are discussing before joining the discussion. Reading the FAQ helps a lot.

    4. Use the Edit button. Seriously, the Edit button is the best thing ever. Appending something you forgot, touching up something here, adding entire talking points, whatever.

    5. Take your time. We're not on IRC, this isn't a text message. You aren't magically going to become irrelevant or unheard in the next five or ten minutes. You've got all the time in the world to make your post; Use it.
  13. Like
    Korren got a reaction from virt in Please Take The Eternal Kingdoms Back To The Drawing Board   
    I think that hits the nail on the head, so to speak - that right now EKs seem to be too nebulous. In a not-great way, they remind me of PlayStation Home apartments, which were basically just environments that you could decorate. Obviously there is a little more to it considering that the user can build/design their own space to a certain degree, but it becomes a minor time/resource sink with the sole purpose of ... what? Hanging out by the hearth? There isn't stake in it, there is no motivation beyond build a great hall and a bedroom and hoarding your treasure there.
     
    There are a lot of ideas that have been coming from the eager player base, and some of them have been good. I'll probably through my own two cents in at some point, but I trust (and want to believe) the devs are going through and collecting ideas, effectively crowd-sourcing some design elements that fit with the overall theme of the game.
  14. Like
    Korren got a reaction from bomzulu in Where Are The Coders?   
    I believe there are a few factors to this:
    They are using a game engine that has a large community (Unity) and is backed by a large catalog of 3rd party toolsets, such as animation, effects, etc which make the entire process much faster than developing an engine from the ground up. The programming language is pretty accessible and robust (C#) Typically, having 2-4x as many artists as programmers/engineers is necessary due to the amount of assets that need to be generated. Basically: it doesn't matter how flawless the code is, if the amount of assets is limited or their quality sucks, that is the first thing that people will see. That being said, a game with bad code won't play well no matter how good the art assets are. I'm sure the 800k target for the kickstarter will be used in part to pay the salary of employees and bring on additional talent as needed (perhaps contracted). This is in addition to the 2.3m that has been raised by other means, which I'm fairly certain they haven't burned through in its entirety yet. 
  15. Like
    Korren got a reaction from bahamutkaiser in Where Are The Coders?   
    I believe there are a few factors to this:
    They are using a game engine that has a large community (Unity) and is backed by a large catalog of 3rd party toolsets, such as animation, effects, etc which make the entire process much faster than developing an engine from the ground up. The programming language is pretty accessible and robust (C#) Typically, having 2-4x as many artists as programmers/engineers is necessary due to the amount of assets that need to be generated. Basically: it doesn't matter how flawless the code is, if the amount of assets is limited or their quality sucks, that is the first thing that people will see. That being said, a game with bad code won't play well no matter how good the art assets are. I'm sure the 800k target for the kickstarter will be used in part to pay the salary of employees and bring on additional talent as needed (perhaps contracted). This is in addition to the 2.3m that has been raised by other means, which I'm fairly certain they haven't burned through in its entirety yet. 
  16. Like
    Korren got a reaction from ravenheart87 in Where Are The Coders?   
    I believe there are a few factors to this:
    They are using a game engine that has a large community (Unity) and is backed by a large catalog of 3rd party toolsets, such as animation, effects, etc which make the entire process much faster than developing an engine from the ground up. The programming language is pretty accessible and robust (C#) Typically, having 2-4x as many artists as programmers/engineers is necessary due to the amount of assets that need to be generated. Basically: it doesn't matter how flawless the code is, if the amount of assets is limited or their quality sucks, that is the first thing that people will see. That being said, a game with bad code won't play well no matter how good the art assets are. I'm sure the 800k target for the kickstarter will be used in part to pay the salary of employees and bring on additional talent as needed (perhaps contracted). This is in addition to the 2.3m that has been raised by other means, which I'm fairly certain they haven't burned through in its entirety yet. 
  17. Like
    Korren reacted to ozzie mozzie in Where Are The Coders?   
    Congratz! Crowdfunding just got us some new hired hands.
     

  18. Like
    Korren reacted to Psyentific in Please Take The Eternal Kingdoms Back To The Drawing Board   
    That's not good though; There has to be some kind of clear vision on what it is, what it does, what it should be. If it's just this vague, nebulous fun thing in concept, then it's going to wind up being this scatter-brained unfocused thing in development, and carrying through to release nobody's really gonna know what to make of it.
     
    @Devs; Boil the concept of what an Eternal Kingdom is right down to three sentences. "This is what it is. This is what it does. This is who it appeals to."
  19. Like
    Korren got a reaction from courant101 in Kickstarter Total As Of 17:45 Central, 18:45 Eastern, Day 30 - 16K Backers!   
    Really fantastic progress so far. I'm looking forward to the steady march of hitting the stretch goals over the coming weeks.
  20. Like
    Korren reacted to crueltylizer in Physics For Cloth And Hair   
    Hi guys
     
    I've tried to find some information about the use of physics for cloth and hair in Crowfall.
     
    From the trailer it seems like capes and such use clothsimulation, which is really great, but I'm wondering if things like hair and normal clothing will also be simulated to some degree or only animated?
     
  21. Like
    Korren got a reaction from ravenheart87 in First Stretch Goals Announced & More Early Bird Specials!   
    If you figure there are another 2 years of development, it becomes 100k per year. There are cheaper FX artists out there, but to get the best quality, you tend to have to pay for it. So, in general, actually a very reasonable goal, funny enough. Also consider that this includes a new race model and all the accompanying animations, armor, etc for that race/gender combo.
  22. Like
    Korren got a reaction from panpear in First Stretch Goals Announced & More Early Bird Specials!   
    Listed as:
    1.0 Million for Stretch Goal #1 (Female Centaurs + FX Artist)
    1.3 Million for Stretch Goal #2 (Mounts + Caravan)
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