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Psyctooth

Testers
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  1. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from bahamutkaiser in BDO news piece perfectly describes why I like BDO   
    You know very little about BDO it seems.
    Do a little research before forming a defined negative bias with examples, otherwise just state what you really think.  Which is you don't want Crowfall to be BDO.
     
    I on the other hand, I've been playing BDO for a while.  I think BDO is a game which appeals to aspects of play which are different from Crowfall and people who want to play a game which offers what it does, play BDO,  Though BDO is by it's very nature of being a Korean MMO, mostly focused on catering to the Asian market.

    Some of the positives of BDO include:
    - A massive emphasis on supporting Role-Playing, something which most western gamer don't care for, again, because their target audience are koreans.
    - Action Combat Focus with combos and massive power gaps - The very mechanics of the game is both a positive and a negative, in BDO you can litterally become the bad ass Mary sue you always wanted to be and can solo bosses even with enough skill, the game is designed like that.
    - Photorealistic Graphics.
    - Minigames, that is if you like fishing, breaking in and horse training.
    - Player Housing.
    - NPCs who do crafting for you.
    - Open World.
    - Open World dungeons and lairs.
    - Summonable bosses and world bosses.
    - PvE and PvP content mixed together.  Node wars are PvP in PvE zones.
    - The ability to steal other players cargo when they do trade, in other words the same package cargo transport systems as ArcheAge.
    - Mounted combat
    - Ships and naval battles.
    Negatives:
    - Insaine grinding system in place for crafting and levelling up the quality of gear.  The game has no gear level, end game gear is based on the quality of the gear, which you have to enhance and the enhancement process is RNG governed.  And to repair gear if your enhancement fails, requires you to either spend loyalty points, real world money or grind to get the resources or gold to buy a copy of that items so you can fix the original.  This is even worse for accessories, you fail an accessory without a safety stone, it is destroyed!
    - You only get XP through killing mobs, the entire game is a grind!
    - You also have life skill levels which are separate from your normal character level.  Which you have to also grind, by crafting or by doing stupid things like lugging around cargo packs on your back, which is dangerous because you get ganked by NPC thieves, which means you have to spend hours with the game client open looping your character in a safe zone just to level up how much items you can carry at any given time!
    - Lifeskills impact on your max health and your max class resource, meaning they are important to min/maxing.
    - Game is very grindy.
    - client is a resource hog and when it is in minimised to tray mode, which you have to do to maintain the timers on your NPC workers, as they do not  continue to work when you're offline, nor do other things such as your farms or your autofish or training up strength lifeskill tick while offline.  It means you have to have the client open all the time!  Again, it is a resource hog, meaning it causes other games to have memory leaks or limits the available memory for them causing lag, it also eats up bandwidth on your internet.  Overall a poorly thought out system.
    - Gameplay mechanics do not account for latency at all, if you have a high ping you will always lose most PvP fights and it makes PvE more difficult than it should be.  Again, it is a Korean MMO originally made for Koreans by Koreans in a country where everywhere people have 15ms of latency at most.  Simply put, the developers never bothered to bother to account for high latency when they designed the game.  (just like with a lot of other Korean action MMOs)
    Of course all these negatives would be positives for the target audience, which are Koreans.
    - Hidden lesser stats.  The Main displayed stats in the game are AP and DP.  That is it!  Lesser stats such as accuracy, attack speed, percentage to damage, etc.  Have a dramatic impact on the overall performance of a character, unfortunately not only are they hidden from the player, they are also poorly described.  Such as cases where it says that accuracy or percentage to health etc increases with enhancement, but it never gives you exact defined amounts.  Also some classes have very low baseline hidden stats which dramatically impacts on the performance of that class.  Effectively terribly implemented system by a developer who has it set in their minds that hiding these things adds variety to the game.  It doesn't!
    - Loot All which should be a gameplay option and is a critically important quality of life aspect of most MMOs is put behind a pay wall!  That is right! You need to have pets to collect loot for you (like in Torchlight 2) however, unlike in Torchlight, you don't start with companion pets to go collect things for you.  You have to purchase them and the more you have, the more effectively the loot all works, meaning you need a lot of them if you want to min/max or item collection when grinding so you don't miss anything.  Problem is the only way to acquire them is in the premium cash shop or when the publishers feel generous enough to give you a pet hand out in an event, which happens once in a blue moon (which is how seldom it happens).  For me, that was the main thing that turned me off the game when I discovered this.  They put loot all behind a pay wall. not to mention a very poorly implemented one.
    - Extortionist prices on cash shop items.  Because the publisher wants to apply a phone games style monetisation to the game.
    - The developers have little control over their own game because the publisher made them their plaything.
  2. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from Kraahk in Playtime Availability   
    Your question is so broad and undefined, it comes off as you just being too lazy or too busy to bother reading the Q&A for the game and you want others to explain things for you.  I don't mean anything by this, I'm just stating this is how it appears to others.
    Also, they did fully answer your question.
    Don't take this the wrong way, but, is this some form of subtle topic starter for an introduction of passive resource farming?  Or passive play types, like in BDO or EVE Online where you're off doing something else while you auto-farm?
  3. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from XpCjU in Playtime Availability   
    Your question is so broad and undefined, it comes off as you just being too lazy or too busy to bother reading the Q&A for the game and you want others to explain things for you.  I don't mean anything by this, I'm just stating this is how it appears to others.
    Also, they did fully answer your question.
    Don't take this the wrong way, but, is this some form of subtle topic starter for an introduction of passive resource farming?  Or passive play types, like in BDO or EVE Online where you're off doing something else while you auto-farm?
  4. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from Zolaz in My Death Star sized worry about Crowfalls PvP campaign   
    Same things happen in EVE Online, that is why you form alliances with other guilds from other time zones, so you can protect each others stuff.  Easy answer.  They also have mechanics which people above me have pointed out which establish pre-defined time windows where your stuff is vulnerable and you're expected to defend it, if you can't, again make sure you have allies who can.
  5. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from QuasiDoc in Playtime Availability   
    Your question is so broad and undefined, it comes off as you just being too lazy or too busy to bother reading the Q&A for the game and you want others to explain things for you.  I don't mean anything by this, I'm just stating this is how it appears to others.
    Also, they did fully answer your question.
    Don't take this the wrong way, but, is this some form of subtle topic starter for an introduction of passive resource farming?  Or passive play types, like in BDO or EVE Online where you're off doing something else while you auto-farm?
  6. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Kraahk in Backer Question   
    Welcome to the forums.
    Adding to what Duffy said, it is recommended to NOT consume your bundle, unless you want to trade specific contained items. It is not necessary to consume (=open) a backer bundle to access the playtest (playtest level depends on the sum total you spend for Crowfall, not the bundle itself). You can also use the available items of your package ingame without consuming it in your account managment. More about claiming backer rewards ingame: here. More about the extra testing parcels: here.
    Have fun, good luck.
    .
     
  7. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Duffy in Backer Question   
    Right now everyone is granted a bunch of extra parcels and buildings so you can test out the Eternal Kingdoms even if your package doesn't have much. These extra items are marked as Testing Copy. Anything marked Testing Copy will go away at release. 
    Your Amber package should have a few parcels and buildings in it, they should not have the Testing Copy tag. If all you see is Testing Copies then the only thing I can think of is that you did't claim/consume your Amber Package yet (though I would assume your ability to Login would be tied to that, but I don't know for sure). You can check that status by logging into the site and looking at your Account->Backer Rewards. You should see either a bundle to claim or a list of all the items in your bundle. If the former you need to claim them before you can use them in the current testing (you'll get them back every time they reset the test servers).
  8. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to ZYBAK in My Death Star sized worry about Crowfalls PvP campaign   
    I'd imagine most campaigns will be using some form of the Banestone mechananic. Essentially the guild wanting to attack gets a Banestone and chooses their attack DAY, then the defenders get to choose the TIME WINDOW for that day in which the other guild can siege.
    I'm a big fan of this mechanic and I'm glad they're using it. 
  9. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Zolaz in My Death Star sized worry about Crowfalls PvP campaign   
    Even if there is a vulnerability window there should be some ways to negatively impact assets that are just sitting there unprotected by real players.  Just like the tree only protected a certain number of buildings in SB.  Totally persistent assets should be a part of the Barbie Dreamhouse in EKs.
  10. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Zolaz in My Death Star sized worry about Crowfalls PvP campaign   
    Lets just pretend that is what you are suppose to do.  Unless you are a carebear, then you initiate Stare sequence.
  11. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Kraahk in My Death Star sized worry about Crowfalls PvP campaign   
    Welcome to the forum.
    It was mentioned that some thralls may be used as guards. But thats more or less some kind of hearsay and we don't know any details and it's not very likely that this will change soon.
    If you are afraid that you may not be able to guard your campaign stronghold 24/7, you should only choose campaigns with a ruleset that allows you to set attack windows (imagine a tree of live that is shielding your stronghold but has to refresh itself some hours a day - and won't protect the stronghold during this time - and you can more or less define when this will be). As far as we know up to now, something like this will be possible, depending on the worlds ruleset. But again, we don't know a lot of details yet.
  12. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to QuasiDoc in Playtime Availability   
    As mentioned above, the passive training allows a player to stay competitive, so a 10 hour player gets nothing on you. The only real disadvantages a player with less time has is gaining combat skills, which take time and practice and harvesting nodes - Harvesting nodes will most likely be a niche style of game-play anyways, so you're not really missing much there either. 
     
    Find a helpful guild that is willing provide their members with gear and enjoy. Aside from that, obviously RL comes first. If you have limited time to play games, maybe its time to hang gaming up rather than request a company to make exceptions. Lastly, with all that said, the majority of this games player-base (so far) are made up of peopel who have RL - jobs, families ect. So i doubt you would ever fall THAT far behind. 
  13. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Kraahk in Playtime Availability   
    Skills advance mostly via passive training instead of gaining experience points by playing. Every campaign starts with a new world instead of playing in the same world forever.
    I'd say it's a lot easier for part-time players to succeed in Crowfall than in other games - as long as they know what they do. In the end you success depend mostly on your own personal skills, not those of your avatar. Nevertheless, playing more will undoubtly give you some advantages. But why shouldn't it?
    So, where do you see a specific problem? The more concrete you are, the better your question can be answered.
  14. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Scree in BDO news piece perfectly describes why I like BDO   
    .... This isn't BDO. Nor is it intended to be played Solo. 
  15. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to XpCjU in BDO news piece perfectly describes why I like BDO   
    No offence or anything, but why would you want crowfall to be like BDO if BDO already exists? 
  16. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Frykka in The apple snatchers and other offline mules   
    I do not believe there will be offline banks (or any type of account bank like the spirit banks we have now) in the CWs.  There will be the import/export vault that does not allow withdrawal of items from the CW and there will be crafted chests for storage.   To store apples you would need more chests which require more and larger buildings and also may take the spots where crafting benches and factories would also want to be slotted in the building.  Considering that in the dregs we will hopefully have to fully craft the walls just to create semi-safe space to craft the building and then the gear, workstations and chests...  you would be carrying those apples for quite awhile before having a place to store them.  This is all speculation of course.
  17. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Recatek in Friendly Fire isn't something you tack on at the end...   
    Agreed. To use ACE's own terminology, it's absolutely a "high risk" feature that should be evaluated ASAP.
  18. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Genocide in average age of the player base   
    All this showed me was 20% of our player base needs a damn job!
  19. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from JamesGoblin in How many FoE guilds are there in Crowfall?   
    What about 'Really Unusually Bored Basement Onanists'?
  20. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from Mayhem_ in Mounts and how they move!   
    You can't speak for ACE; Don't pull down the OP's ideas, I think they are fantastic ideas worth consideration.
  21. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from JamesGoblin in Whatchoo Listenin To?   
    https://youtu.be/_zH9wHWMi_k
  22. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from Overdhose in Why I've given up on the big companies of the video game industry ...   
    Shouldn't put programmers in the same boat as buisnessmen, believe me when i say this, unless you're passionate about what you are programming, you wouldn't want to program anything.  And judging by the bugs in a lot of modern games where they are reliant on packaged game development kits, it's more of a case of throwing a lot of armatures with poor training at problems which should be tackled by experts.

    But you need to keep this in mind, what a game designer is passionate about is usually entirely different to what a programmer is passionate about in the realm of software development.  Especially in the case of specializations, the problem is a lot of the time the kinds of programmers who get hired to work on AAA games have worked on a variety of applications, many different games, some of them being crap ones, others being decent ones and then likely the next thing they work on is an application program, not a video game.  Most do contractual work and move from project to project working on multiple different kinds of applications in the field of their specialization.

    Look at John Carmack as an example; Before he got passionate for VR, he was passionate about creating a game engine, he never knew how to design a good game, he just knew what tools game designers wanted to make a good game with.  Almost every programmer I know thinks like this, there are usually 3 categories of programmers, designers who become programmers so they can make their own games, mathematicians who become programmers because they are fascinated with creating things using computers and innovating and then there are those who want to make video games but then discover they lack the intellectual capacity to do so, so instead put their knowledge to use to try and make a living, usually in web development or basic applications, as web development and basic applications is far easier than both making video games and complex applications such as API and digital media applications.

    And out of those there are many different kinds of things those programmers are passionate about, two of the more common ones I encounter are programmers obsessed with technical achievements, as in optimization, making better use of hardware limitations, coming up with cool new physics technologies and so on.  The other being those who belong to the "I want to write elegant code" group of thinkers, people who seek to create ever more simplified and beautiful high level programming code which compiles more cleanly into binary, so that their code sets a standard for flawless near perfection and simplicity of form.  Very different thinking to someone who has a passion for making video games.  In fact, I've found being passionate about making video games tends to get in the way of being a programmer and can ultimately distract someone from their passion for programming.
     
    From my point of view, now this is entirely my opinion so I could be right or wrong, it doesn't matter.  But, I believe people are looking at things all  wrong, that Neo-Capitalism is directly to blame.  It makes for a fantastic generalist boogie man at best and at worst used as a straw man argument for a perceived  problem based on popular belief on the internet which is often wildly exaggerated and based entirely on assumption formed from snippets of widely ranging information which little to no actual evidence.  Whether or not this is true is besides the point, the real issue doesn't revolve around it, I believe that it isn't so much the source of the problem but one of the ingredients or possibly the visible result of the problem.  I mean if it really is that bad, you'd think people would be discussing this sort of thing on network television, it would make for great material for them to attack video games with, since as we are all aware the different entertainment mediums moguls usually despise each other.

    Capitalism can exist and yet a company can produce fantastic products which their fans absolutely love, while at the same time being not very pleasant people to work with, key example, Nintendo.

    But, think about it, what does Nintendo have, which these other companies don't?  People in charge who care about their product, people in charge who care about the people who work for them and people in charge who are passionate about video games.  Nintendo is as capitalist as they come and pump out the same game sequels year after year and have really draconian approaches to copyright.  But they are extremely successful, know why?  Because they treat their fans well and love their products and treat their employees well.  

    Hope that just lends some perspective, the problem is with as I stated before, people who simply don't care and lack passion.  Not with capitalistic thinking; People can still be money minded and at the same time care about the products they represent;  It's not that hard to do.
  23. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from Urahara in Why I've given up on the big companies of the video game industry ...   
    Shouldn't put programmers in the same boat as buisnessmen, believe me when i say this, unless you're passionate about what you are programming, you wouldn't want to program anything.  And judging by the bugs in a lot of modern games where they are reliant on packaged game development kits, it's more of a case of throwing a lot of armatures with poor training at problems which should be tackled by experts.

    But you need to keep this in mind, what a game designer is passionate about is usually entirely different to what a programmer is passionate about in the realm of software development.  Especially in the case of specializations, the problem is a lot of the time the kinds of programmers who get hired to work on AAA games have worked on a variety of applications, many different games, some of them being crap ones, others being decent ones and then likely the next thing they work on is an application program, not a video game.  Most do contractual work and move from project to project working on multiple different kinds of applications in the field of their specialization.

    Look at John Carmack as an example; Before he got passionate for VR, he was passionate about creating a game engine, he never knew how to design a good game, he just knew what tools game designers wanted to make a good game with.  Almost every programmer I know thinks like this, there are usually 3 categories of programmers, designers who become programmers so they can make their own games, mathematicians who become programmers because they are fascinated with creating things using computers and innovating and then there are those who want to make video games but then discover they lack the intellectual capacity to do so, so instead put their knowledge to use to try and make a living, usually in web development or basic applications, as web development and basic applications is far easier than both making video games and complex applications such as API and digital media applications.

    And out of those there are many different kinds of things those programmers are passionate about, two of the more common ones I encounter are programmers obsessed with technical achievements, as in optimization, making better use of hardware limitations, coming up with cool new physics technologies and so on.  The other being those who belong to the "I want to write elegant code" group of thinkers, people who seek to create ever more simplified and beautiful high level programming code which compiles more cleanly into binary, so that their code sets a standard for flawless near perfection and simplicity of form.  Very different thinking to someone who has a passion for making video games.  In fact, I've found being passionate about making video games tends to get in the way of being a programmer and can ultimately distract someone from their passion for programming.
     
    From my point of view, now this is entirely my opinion so I could be right or wrong, it doesn't matter.  But, I believe people are looking at things all  wrong, that Neo-Capitalism is directly to blame.  It makes for a fantastic generalist boogie man at best and at worst used as a straw man argument for a perceived  problem based on popular belief on the internet which is often wildly exaggerated and based entirely on assumption formed from snippets of widely ranging information which little to no actual evidence.  Whether or not this is true is besides the point, the real issue doesn't revolve around it, I believe that it isn't so much the source of the problem but one of the ingredients or possibly the visible result of the problem.  I mean if it really is that bad, you'd think people would be discussing this sort of thing on network television, it would make for great material for them to attack video games with, since as we are all aware the different entertainment mediums moguls usually despise each other.

    Capitalism can exist and yet a company can produce fantastic products which their fans absolutely love, while at the same time being not very pleasant people to work with, key example, Nintendo.

    But, think about it, what does Nintendo have, which these other companies don't?  People in charge who care about their product, people in charge who care about the people who work for them and people in charge who are passionate about video games.  Nintendo is as capitalist as they come and pump out the same game sequels year after year and have really draconian approaches to copyright.  But they are extremely successful, know why?  Because they treat their fans well and love their products and treat their employees well.  

    Hope that just lends some perspective, the problem is with as I stated before, people who simply don't care and lack passion.  Not with capitalistic thinking; People can still be money minded and at the same time care about the products they represent;  It's not that hard to do.
  24. Like
    Psyctooth got a reaction from Urahara in Why I've given up on the big companies of the video game industry ...   
    From my perspective, greed and neo-capitalism isn't the problem.  The problem is a lack of care for the product companies represent.  I got nothing against capitalism or at the very least, what is required, a means to generate revenue so a project can be supported during development and post release, be supported to continue running.  My issue lies in disrespect of the people who are responsible for creating the products which are responsible for generating the profits and in turn a disrespect or outright neglect to care for the product by the people who are in charge of the companies.

    Care for the product results in creation of good quality product which leads to happy customers which concludes in loyal customers.  And that right there should be the focus of people in the industry.  It is unfortunately something that is lacking, this treatment of video games in the same way as consumer products in the 1980s of being function over substance and bling over quality is the major issue.
     
    However, the biggest problem is I think the whole AAA method of games development, the what I'd like to call "applying Movie Studio Approach to video games" as opposed to the previous method which is still used by most small studios which is the "Design Approach".

    The AAA Movie studio approach is to throw a lot of people at a problem to try and solve it, rather than actually spending money on hiring experts to solve the issue, it is also about hiring a lot of people to do small amounts of work for way more money than needs to be spent simply to bring a project to completion in a much shorter span, the only thing in AAA games which looks any good by such an approach is naturally the art, set pieces and cut scenes.  Because using the same approach as in VFX does work.  However, this approach when it comes to game design, programming and story writing fails dramatically due to something which is unique to both design, writing and in particular software engineering.  It in fact makes a project take longer to complete!  It has the opposite effect!  It is also primarily the reason why a lot of AAA games are buggy and crap these days!

    It's coined as Brooks’ law.  You can read about this in the essay The Mythical Man-Month.  Something I have taken a keen interest in of late as I've decided to resume my studies in software engineering and programming.
     
    We also need to consider that, not all instances of terrible games are due to bad publishers or dispassionate developers.

    Sometimes a game being bad is a result of forces outside the control of the developers themselves, such as being given a broken game engine to work with (Star Wars The Old Republic), or being told to develop a game for a console with little to zero support from the console's manufacturer in the form of a refusal to give out documentation for the assembly commands and low level programming APIs, a good example of this would be the Nintendo 64, where Nintendo outright refused to give out their microcode documentation to anyone who wasn't a second party developer, or held enough popularity muscle or was a large enough company that they can convince Nintendo to give them the documentation so they can write their own microcode.  

    Most studios were stuck with crappy microcode APIs such as the poorly profiled default one provided in the development kit, Fast3D.  Which is why a lot of 3rd party games on that console sucked.

    There are many factors which lead to problems, however the one thing that can be solved, is the attitudes of the people who work at a company.
     
  25. Like
    Psyctooth reacted to Reno in Why I've given up on the big companies of the video game industry ...   
    I think a balance between that "Big Business Mentality" and genuine interest or a decent level of understanding of all echelons within the development would contribute to a successful name. Capital is something that will always be needed to progress / maintenance on the current project, fund future projects or to get those involved to where they are trying to go. Everything is a stepping stone leading somewhere else.
     
    While some groups really can be ruthless with money earning tactics, like Black Ops 3 taking advantage of the "Chance Lottery" causing millions of underaged people across the globe to take part in this "Legal Gambling". Spending money in order to earn Tokens that are then spent on a virtual lottery of items that will help them customize their character. A feature that is not new to the gaming community.
     
    Can we say they are right or wrong. Maybe, it would depend on the point of view. You could say they are betraying the trust of the fanbase, by taking advantage of them, but in the end it will always be the consumers fault for falling for such easy money grabbing tactics. [Myself being guilty of spending hundreds of dollars on Black Ops 3]. 

    "Yes the game might be cheap or even free, But when you see something you like and you want it you spend for it"

    That was a quote from a good friend of mine, and he is right. When you put certain things in front of the consumer they will buy it. They want it, and they will try to get it. I can't really see myself blaming "Greedy CEOs" or anything of the sort, I can only blame the consumers for it.
     
    Only problem I do have with these tactics, is when they have the audacity to request such large sums of money for almost menial and worthless virtual goods and do not "Give back to the consumers".  For example Elder Scrolls Online. $20 for a horse. Yipee. Even worse, those past typical mmorpgs I don't feel like even listing. $60 For pretty costume. Double yipee.
     
     
    As an aspiring game developer, I believe in a balance of that big business mentality to keep the ambition, and drive going. While staying an active participant in the development, and understanding the various moving parts from the player and developer point of view. 
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