jshiu999

Testers
  • Content count

    41
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About jshiu999

  • Rank
    Nestling

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling

Recent Profile Visitors

629 profile views
  1. A large Battle Royale that scales from minutes up to a week/month long, with campaigns which are party-modes (solo, duo, squad, guild, Order/Chaose/Balance, God-faction) to choose from. With Crafting and AI PVE on the side, dynamic weather/climate, and a pub-like area (EK). When I first tested Hunger Dome, my initial thought was that they were going to expand the Battle-Royale style by adding larger worlds, refined classes and abilities, larger party sizes etc... . Right now, (I think because there's so little action and engaging stuff) I'm so damn lost on what kind of game the devs are trying to make anymore.
  2. So I noticed that soft-launch is gonna be in 8-9 months. I just checked back into the game and it still seems pretty stale to me. What should I expect Crowfall to have by soft-launch?
  3. Why is testing so boring? What exactly is being tested right now? I kind of missed Siege Perilous and Hungerdome, where we tested combat and sieging. I'm not sure what Crowfall is testing right now, is it the Crafting Recipes? World Generation? Or are they simply waiting for the team to finish up the character models and rigging and are fixing bugs while they're waiting? Can someone explain to me what Crowfall is currently "testing" right now? It would be cool if they would bring Hungerdome back, but as a "slow" version (so basically a Hungerdome that lasts hours) as a campaign instead of the one we have right now. The current campaigns feels empty for us players who aren't in guilds :c Edit: For clarity I've tested the game since 2015 Hungerdome, and I play on both testing and live client. My point is that there are no players in the game, Hungerdome and Siege Perilous were what made the game fun to test, because they attracted a lot of players, and the content was streamable.
  4. I'm just going to say what's on my head right now, no editing or planning. I am a Chinese born, American-Chinese and I visit China every year, usually staying there for about a month. I know Crowfall's vision is that they don't plan to cater towards everyone, but I just want to let this out. In China, very few people owns a home PC, yet they have a profound esports culture. How is this possible? Internet bars. I've visited various internet bars before, from the luxurious ones with massaging chairs to internet bars that were extremely unsanitary, and reeked of cigarette smells. The bosses/managers of these internet bars, aren't gamers. They're only in it for the easy money because of the Chinese people's addiction to games, they do not care what games are on their public computers besides popular titles. Here's the catch though, Tencent is basically Steam but for the Eastern world (China anyways), and it pretty much publishes every big game titles from the Western world (DOTA, LoL, WoW, Hearthstone, Starcraft, Tera, you name it) All these PC bar owners have to do, is simply have TCP downloaded (Tencent's Steam is called TCP I believe, I can't recall what it means or stood for) and wait for the money to roll in. With this in mind, I find it very hard to see that Crowfall would gain a significant playerbase from China without Tencent being their publisher. It's even possible that Tencent will never even consider publishing Crowfall, they have a history of only investing into games they see huge potential in (for example right now: PUBG, they already released two mobile versions of the game just recently.) Edit: To sum it up, the people in China plays their games on internet bars, but the owners of these internet bars only use games from Tencent. Perfect World is a Chinese publisher, but I have never recognized any of their games in any of the internet bars I've played in.
  5. Should Crowfall learn from PUBG?

    Yes, I tested Crowfall that time :") PUBG is actually pretty big right now, It's popular with streamers right now because of how tense it can be to watch, and how tense it feels to play it for new players. It's this feeling of "I could die at any moment" that makes it this way. And I'm not feeling that from Crowfall (a game that has survival elements), I didn't feel that from Crowfall since Hungerdome and I don't see that Crowfall getting to that point with its current position.
  6. I read the "Crowfal should be more like Overwatch" topic and this is my version of it. I want to compare Crowfall to a survival shooter game: PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds (PUBG). Yes, Crowfall is an mmo, but the mmo-aspect falls into crafting and socializing. Crowfall's campaigns in itself is a survival game, and PUBG takes the survival part (remember Hungerdome?) and puts that with the speedy pacing of a modern shooter (imagine CSGO/Overwatch). When you're on the battlefield/campaign the game should feel life-threatening and truly like you're risking everything you own, I think that PUBG's speedy pacing is what makes the game represent that. The fact that you could die at any moment in mere seconds without knowing the whereabouts of your attacker is what keeps the player on guard at all times, and when the player does die the feel that you were helpless and weak is what motivates the player to try again, but this time improving their ability. I don't think Crowfall's problem is that combat is awkward. Crowfall's problem is that is does not feel like a survival, coordinate together to overcome, high risk and high reward survival game. The combat feels awkward because the devs are meshing the "long duration" combat of a traditional MMORPG to that of a "life-threatening" survival game. My thoughts are that it is ok for fights in survival games to be long, but they should preserve the feeling "I could die at any moment." My ideas of what could be done, is to lower the health to low values (would make players value their health more), and increase cooldowns and resource costs for defense/utility abilities so that players would need to play more carefully with those abilities, thinking constantly of how to optimize their decisions to prolong the "lifespan" their character who could die in one more move. This would make: Druid's and Confessors value their dash abilities more rather than spamming them mindlessly or whenever they're off Cooldown; it will make knight's think more carefully about their shield ability: My shield is on a long Cooldown, should I wait to block their high damage skill? He is holding onto that high-damage ability awfully long, should I use it now? ; Druid's are also forced to think more about where to place their bubbles if mana costs and Cooldowns are high, versus, where normally they would stack them all in a general area where there is a battle going on. Imagine if the healing bubble has a time limit, that would cause druid players to think about ally movement, speed, location, and dash/teleportation/speed buff ability cooldowns. Lowering health while increasing risk of using an ability would allow for shorter fights, but long fights are also possible if fighting players/teams are skilled enough at managing their abilities. Crowfall would essentially have the survival feeling of PUBG, but more, because Crowfall allow for more counterplay than PUBG does because of Crowfall's nature of having 6+abilities and powers to work with. Of course these are purely theories, this is my opinion, and honestly I have never designed a game before, so I could be horribly wrong. Do you think Crowfall is fine as it is? Do you agree with my idea? If not, I'm eager to hear your ideas.
  7. Crowfall should feel like Overwatch

    I actually agree that the "Overwatch" feel would be nice, but more specifically I think that the statement: "Crowfall should feel like Overwatch" would be more clarified if we compare Crowfall to a survival shooter game: PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds (PUBG). Yes, Crowfall is an mmo, but the mmo-aspect falls into crafting and socializing. Crowfall's campaigns in itself is a survival game, and PUBG takes the survival part (remember Hungerdome?) and puts that with the speedy pacing of a modern shooter (imagine CSGO/Overwatch). When you're on the battlefield/campaign the game should feel life-threatening and truly like you're risking everything you own, I think that PUBG's speedy pacing is what makes the game represent that. The fact that you could die at any moment in mere seconds without knowing the whereabouts of your attacker is what keeps the player on guard at all times, and when the player does die the feel that you were helpless and weak is what motivates the player to try again, but this time improving their ability. I don't think Crowfall's problem is that combat is awkward. Crowfall's problem is that is does not feel like a survival, coordinate together to overcome, high risk and high reward survival game. The combat feels awkward because the devs are meshing the "long duration" combat of a traditional MMORPG to that of a "life-threatening" survival game. My thoughts are that it is ok for fights in survival games to be long, but they should preserve the feeling "I could die at any moment." My ideas of what could be done, is to lower the health to low values (would make players value their health more), and increase cooldowns and resource costs for defense/utility abilities so that players would need to play more carefully with those abilities, thinking constantly of how to optimize their decisions to prolong the "lifespan" their character who could die in one more move. This would make: Druid's and Confessors value their dash abilities more rather than spamming them mindlessly or whenever they're off Cooldown; it will make knight's think more carefully about their shield ability: My shield is on a long Cooldown, should I wait to block their high damage skill? He is holding onto that high-damage ability awfully long, should I use it now? ; Druid's are also forced to think more about where to place their bubbles if mana costs and Cooldowns are high, versus, where normally they would stack them all in a general area where there is a battle going on. Imagine if the healing bubble has a time limit, that would cause druid players to think about ally movement, speed, location, and dash/teleportation/speed buff ability cooldowns. Lowering health while increasing risk of using an ability would allow for shorter fights, but long fights are also possible if fighting players/teams are skilled enough at managing their abilities. Crowfall would essentially have the survival feeling of PUBG, but more, because Crowfall allow for more counterplay than PUBG does because of Crowfall's nature of having 6+abilities and powers to work with. Of course these are purely theories, this is my opinion, and honestly I have never designed a game before, so I could be horribly wrong.
  8. Last question, will you be making more versions of the Weapon Disciplines? For example: maybe Master of Mystical Staves (I) could be the one you have right now; Master of Mystical Staves (II) could be equipped something by like a knight, but given different abilities (I really like Battlemages as you can see); and a Master of Mystical Staves (III) could be give druids more damage abilities.
  9. Will Cleric still be the front-line support who plays the role of leading and raising your team's moral? The idea is cool, kind of reminds me of the Privateer class in pirate or Captain class in Lord of the Rings Online.
  10. Why is it some races have 4 available classes but others three?
  11. Do the new class abilities still require a specific to weapon use? I was hoping customization would let me make something like a Battlemage (close combat mage) or arcane knight combination.
  12. If your vessel dies, will the discipline get destroyed along with it?
  13. Compilation?

    sure, youtube links are fine. I usually just look for the plays myself anyways.
  14. Compilation?

    Thanks for all the replies everyone. I haven't decided yet, but next video will probably be another compilation, maybe for a certain person?
  15. Compilation?

    A compilation of the fights I found that I think deserves a spotlight.