Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

voronwe eldalom

Testers
  • Content Count

    23
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to frostythundertrod in Half Giant Rangers   
    Currently the half giant race has access to a Tank: Myrmidon,  Support: Cleric, and DPS: Champion. but no specialist. since Minotuars can be rangers I think there is a case for outer large races to be rangers.   
  2. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from Isarii in Gordon Walton - are you the one who brought us Trammel?   
    It's pretty refreshing to see that kind of in-depth and honest answer, hopefully it'll be of some comfort to all the UO players. Thanks a lot for sharing that with us. That latter bit about the goals of this game is extremely encouraging, as well.
     
     
    Now, were you also behind the NGE for SWG? 
  3. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from ShadoPandauin in Gordon Walton - are you the one who brought us Trammel?   
    It's pretty refreshing to see that kind of in-depth and honest answer, hopefully it'll be of some comfort to all the UO players. Thanks a lot for sharing that with us. That latter bit about the goals of this game is extremely encouraging, as well.
     
     
    Now, were you also behind the NGE for SWG? 
  4. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from mavol in Gordon Walton - are you the one who brought us Trammel?   
    It's pretty refreshing to see that kind of in-depth and honest answer, hopefully it'll be of some comfort to all the UO players. Thanks a lot for sharing that with us. That latter bit about the goals of this game is extremely encouraging, as well.
     
     
    Now, were you also behind the NGE for SWG? 
  5. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from Sinij in Gordon Walton - are you the one who brought us Trammel?   
    It's pretty refreshing to see that kind of in-depth and honest answer, hopefully it'll be of some comfort to all the UO players. Thanks a lot for sharing that with us. That latter bit about the goals of this game is extremely encouraging, as well.
     
     
    Now, were you also behind the NGE for SWG? 
  6. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to krow in Shadowbane-Mourning Vets   
    Yep, old Hands of Providence / House Ancoran. I learned a great many things about PvP fighting in all the big battles from the city states & sovereign forces who have already posted in this thread. Good times, good times indeed.
     
    So, lets launch this game already...
  7. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from Taegan in Gordon Walton - are you the one who brought us Trammel?   
    It's pretty refreshing to see that kind of in-depth and honest answer, hopefully it'll be of some comfort to all the UO players. Thanks a lot for sharing that with us. That latter bit about the goals of this game is extremely encouraging, as well.
     
     
    Now, were you also behind the NGE for SWG? 
  8. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from courant101 in 02/02/15 - Hunger Week... It's About Time.   
    I am all about the idea of a permanent player city, built with the sweat and blood of you and your guildmates and defended against all comers. Two weeks is definitely not enough for that kind of experience. Not even a year is. But I could see getting that same experience, and perhaps an even better one, by building that same city across many worlds - as long as there is a purpose to it.
     
    It seems not so much different than when your city is sacked and you have to rebuild, maybe even start from scratch somewhere else. As long as you believe a there's purpose to doing it all over again, it will be fun. Most SB players had lost that purpose by the end, even before the plug was pulled. 
     
    I think the fact that each world will be unique is important to create that sense of purpose. I think it would also be a big help if there are different kinds of victory conditions, so players have different reasons to fight aside from just being the best and collecting the most. For instance, trying to stem the tide of Hunger, and saving mortal souls by transporting them off-world, instead of taking the world for all its worth. 
     
    This might even be hinted at already. The idea presented above, that we are all "Divine Champions" sent to (it sounds like) essentially assault, pillage and exploit the native mortals of dying worlds for our holy masters seems purposefully skewed towards being one particular perspective, one perhaps with a victory condition that gets you more loot and "trophies" but at the cost of some other victory condition and reward representing a more altruistic path. If this kind of dichotomy is not represented in the mechanics, the players are probably going to make it themselves, anyway.
     
    My question is what happens if no kingdom emerges victorious at the end of winter when a world is consumed? Would a reset take place even if no one is in position to claim victory? What if the going's just getting good? 
  9. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to doc gonzo in Surprised To Hear So Many People Calling It A Lobby Game   
    i'm sorry to trouble you with this...but even among the most vocal detractors, which i can safely say i one of, to today's Reveal...i have yet to see anyoen at the point of /ragequit as you put it...
     
    voicing Concerns yes...but not rampant hysteria...
     
    did i miss something here?
     
    a large part of it , for me at least...is coming to terms with the fact that what we have been shown so far is indeed a next gen MOBA, but Team based ( as in Guilds) as opposed to Individuals....
     
    some of us don't like the Idea of fighting for a Trophy, yes, as Oridi put it, we state clearly we just like the Fights...but we like it to be lasting...
     
    to use my own experience...we'll talk about Mourning...the ONLY server to make it form Launch to ReBoot...
     
    why? because there was no "win condition" if there had been, then the Rainbow Alliance woudl have "won" the Server by having all "kneel" in Fealty...and that woudl have been that...
     
    instead there were Wars...and stagnant times, and moar Wars...the ebb and flow as inexorable as the Tide...determined by nothing more than the Players alone...
     
    not Code
     
    hence my Concerns...i am hoping for a Virtual World with all the consequences that entails....
     
    not a Trophy
  10. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from soulein in 02/02/15 - Hunger Week... It's About Time.   
    I am all about the idea of a permanent player city, built with the sweat and blood of you and your guildmates and defended against all comers. Two weeks is definitely not enough for that kind of experience. Not even a year is. But I could see getting that same experience, and perhaps an even better one, by building that same city across many worlds - as long as there is a purpose to it.
     
    It seems not so much different than when your city is sacked and you have to rebuild, maybe even start from scratch somewhere else. As long as you believe a there's purpose to doing it all over again, it will be fun. Most SB players had lost that purpose by the end, even before the plug was pulled. 
     
    I think the fact that each world will be unique is important to create that sense of purpose. I think it would also be a big help if there are different kinds of victory conditions, so players have different reasons to fight aside from just being the best and collecting the most. For instance, trying to stem the tide of Hunger, and saving mortal souls by transporting them off-world, instead of taking the world for all its worth. 
     
    This might even be hinted at already. The idea presented above, that we are all "Divine Champions" sent to (it sounds like) essentially assault, pillage and exploit the native mortals of dying worlds for our holy masters seems purposefully skewed towards being one particular perspective, one perhaps with a victory condition that gets you more loot and "trophies" but at the cost of some other victory condition and reward representing a more altruistic path. If this kind of dichotomy is not represented in the mechanics, the players are probably going to make it themselves, anyway.
     
    My question is what happens if no kingdom emerges victorious at the end of winter when a world is consumed? Would a reset take place even if no one is in position to claim victory? What if the going's just getting good? 
  11. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to cemya in Surprised To Hear So Many People Calling It A Lobby Game   
    It is not so much the world wipe.  It is nervousness on how it happens.  If it is player driven, then great.  But if it is driven by an automatic timer, whether you call it a world clock or a "Hunger" mechanism, then it takes the decision to "end" that world out of the hands of the players.
     
    I hope they consider keeping player choice foremost.  They should provide options for players to keep fighting for worlds that might otherwise expire.  It should be difficult but not impossible.
     
    But give people the option to fight to keep that clock from striking midnight.
  12. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to frobobo in Surprised To Hear So Many People Calling It A Lobby Game   
    Let me talk about SB since Todd and other SBers have brought it up.  Yes wipe brought players back; why wouldn't it, a wipe was rare, and it was a clean slate.  But it was "fake population".  It was just a surge - not because some guild took over and dominated, but because the game itself got boring, and a wipe was just a good reason to try again.  Population would always nose dive after a wipe back to the real population.  And, keep in mind, with every wipe, boredom set in faster and faster.  The emulators are currently on a wipe rampage and it's not doing them any favors.  I don't even bother anymore, because no one really seems to care/try on the emulators due to how cheapened the experiences have become. 
     
    In addition, shadowbane also already had its own natural cycles of boredom/invigoration.  Servers that were seemingly dead would come back alive on their own.  Do you realize how amazing that is?  The developers had to do NOTHING, and a server would just, BAM, come back onto its feet and be rearing with competition again.  This is one of the most unique thing to come from shadowbane, and it's amazing its own developers have not noticed this (maybe not, they quit early on).  The reason for this is also much more interesting than "oh look a wipe, let's try again - ok im bored let's quit and wait for another wipe".  The reason was likely because how much the game could simply change on it's own when players controlled everything. 
     
    Empires would crumble, if not from time alone, and the bottom feeders would soon be kings.  Blood clan took over mourning.  Blood clan was a terrible guild!  How did they do this?  Oh yea, all the big boys quit.  But wait, now XYZ guild sees this and gets motivated at the easy pickings.  They return to the server to take them out. People tell their friends to log on cause they need more bodies for an upcoming siege.  Then they tell their friends.  A few small groups of friends decide to keep playing after a fun siege or two, and more guilds sprout up.  Then the server looks healthy and more people come back.  Sometimes new guilds are formed, other times old ones rear their heads again for the action.  Either way - it was awesome, and I'm not making this up.  I saw it happen countless times over many servers.
     
    None of this can exist in a world of arbitrary rules and safety nets.  I personally thought this was the risk they would be taking (they said they were taking a risk!): "Let players control everything".
     
    If I build a castle and it stands for 5 years, it's going to HURT if someone removes it.  This will not exist anymore.  Consequence is on the same level of any other PvP game.  That's why I call this design "long-term battleground".  That's really all it is.  You fight for a trophy.  It's an e-sport now or something, not all out war.  But really, if I want to play an e-sport game with trophies, clear-cut winners and losers, then I'll just play Dota2.  I'm only saying this because I feel like the current direction is going to lead to a game few people give a crap about after a year.  All these fluffy people sitting around here going WOW AMAZING INNOVATIVE design are the kind of people who also disappear 2 months in, after they get their fill and get bored. 
     
    You want an addictive game that will keep people coming back for years?  Add consequence.  Long-term battlegrounds are not consequence.  Consequence is bred from permanence.  If you make a bad choice it stays with you.  There's no wipe, there's no undoing it - there's simply dealing with it and moving forward (or don't move forward and give up - this game is not for everyone, right?).  I don't know, maybe this game is just not for me instead.
  13. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to surBear in Surprised To Hear So Many People Calling It A Lobby Game   
    lol.  These forums are hilarious.  It is like the blind men trying to describe an elephant.  "Its a snake" 'No, it is a tree" "Its more like a rope"   lol
  14. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to soulein in 02/02/15 - Hunger Week... It's About Time.   
    But how meaningful were the cities in SB? When the servers were active, we'd defend those towns to the last man- even if it took all night! We've all been there. But when the servers weren't active, and player participation laspsed, we let those same cities rot until some scrub guild came along and won it without blows. Think of it this way: that exploded world is history- history you were a part of for a couple of months- and now it'll be remembered in the annals of the game's lore.
     
    What we're looking at isn't the difference between consequence and no consequence, but rather the difference between a meaningful, spectacular death on the one hand and a slow, drawn out wasting disease.
  15. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to jtoddcoleman in 02/02/15 - Hunger Week... It's About Time.   
    02/02/15 - Hunger Week... It's About Time.
     
    OK, folks. 
     
    Welcome to Hunger Week!
     
    Until now, we’ve been describing the game in general terms.  The real differences between Crowfall and other MMORPGs have been “creeping around the edges” of our weekly updates.
     
    Today is the turning point – where we start to separate away from the herd.  Unfortunately (but inevitably) that means we’re going to turn some people off today.  But hopefully those of you who stick around will be here for the long haul.
     
    About a decade ago, I was the creative director on a game called “Shadowbane.”  Shadowbane had a lot of flaws, but the vision is still something that I am very proud of.  The Wolfpack founders (of which I am one) came up with something innovative – really innovative.  It’s surprising how rare that is, even in the game space.
     
    Unfortunately, the vision was also flawed.  SB had tons of technical and operational issues, yes, but that’s not what I am talking about.  I’m talking about the crack in the foundation of the design:
     
    At its heart, SB was a strategy game.  And strategy games can’t last forever.
     
    To illustrate this point, let me use an analogy.  Every Thanksgiving, my family gets together for a game of RISK.  Only it’s not “let’s play Risk every thanksgiving” – it’s “let’s pick up from where we left last year, in the SAME game of Risk.”
     
    The same game.  The same conflict.  Year after year after year:
     
    Imagine that, in year 2, Uncle Bob starts winning.
     
    In year 3, Uncle Bob presses the advantage.  By the end of this game session, Bob basically owns the board.
     
    Fast forward 10 years.  We’re still playing that same game.  Uncle Bob is now an unassailable tyrant. 
     
    The other players (i.e. everyone other than Uncle Bob) all wander away from the board to watch football or something – because they know they don’t stand a chance.  If a new player joins the game, Bob snuffs them out in their infancy, and they quit immediately.
     
    Everyone is bored.  Even Uncle Bob is bored – because he hasn’t faced a challenge in over a decade.  But he won’t give up by choice.  That isn’t human nature.
     
    In Shadowbane, I called this phenomenon server stagnation.  The game is incredibly fun – right up until someone wins.  Then, without a server reset, the game stagnates and everyone quits. 
     
    TL;DR version:
     
    One of the key elements of strategy games is they have a win condition followed by a board reset.  You start the game, you play the game, someone wins.  You reset the board and start a new game. 
     
    One of the key elements of MMOs is that they are persistent.  Actually, that’s not the right word, is it?  They’re permanent.  Players expect to play them over years, and the game world is (generally) static.
     
    These two design goals seem diametrically opposed: the game must reset and the game must last forever. 
    Can they be married together?  I think they can.
     
    Eternal Heroes, Dying Worlds
    What if characters are persistent/permanent – but the Worlds are not?
    What if your character exists outside of any given Campaign, and can join new matches once a match is over?
    This opens up a whole new world of design possibilities.
    Characters are permanent, and advance over the course of many Campaigns.  This gives you the feeling of persistence that we’ve come to expect from MMOs.  Campaigns, though, aren’t permanent.  They still be “persistent” between game sessions – but they don’t last forever.  How long should the last?  As long as the game is still fun!  And they don’t all have to be the same duration.  Some Campaigns could last 1 week, or 1 month.  or 6 months.  or 1 year. These Campaigns aren’t just “instances”, though -- they are fully populated, continent-sized, seamless zone MMO servers.  The only thing they have in common with an “instance” is that they are time-limited. Because each Campaign is marching towards an end condition, this means that the World doesn’t have to be static anymore. We can break the Campaign into different “phases”, and adjust the rules of the game change during each phase.  We can allow the players to fundamentally change the world, without fear of the long term problems this might create. Why not make each Campaign unique?  Why can’t each one have a completely unique world map (mountains, forests, lakes, castles, villages, quarries, mines, mills – you name it)?  The “exploration” phase of the game can be different in each Campaign.  The world will never be stale. To that point: since each game is a stand-alone event, we can even change the rules (and win conditions) of each Campaign.  We can experiment with different rules, to see which ones are more popular – and keep the game continually fresh. So, how do you explain this? 
     
    The Hunger.  The Hunger is a mysterious, destructive force that spreads from one world to the next, like an infection – twisting and corrupting everything it touches.  Eventually, the Hunger consumes the World itself, and it is destroyed. 
     
    Players take the roles of Divine Champions, immortal participants in the War of the Gods.  They join the Campaigns to scavenge the Dying Worlds for relics, resources and glory.
     
    A Campaign might look like this:
     
    Phase 1 is Spring.  The Campaign map is hidden by fog of war.  You are dropped (typically naked) into an unknown, deadly environment.  This world is filled with the ruins of ancient castles, abandoned mines and haunted villages – which you have to explore to scavenge for weapons, tools and the resources to start building fortifications.
     
    Phase 2 is Summer.  The Hunger starts to infect the creatures.  Resources become scarce.  Your team claims an abandoned quarry and must fight to keep it.  You use the stone to build an ancient keep, to use it as staging areas to attack their neighbors.
     
    Phase 3 is Fall.  The creatures become more deadly as the Hunger takes hold.  Resources are heavily contested and transporting them is fraught with peril.  Your guild frantically builds a wall around your city, as the nature of conflict shifts from smaller skirmishes to siege warfare.
     
    Phase 4 is Winter.  The environment is brutal.  Warmth is hard to come by.  Your kingdoms grows in strength; your neighbors falter and you demand that they swear fealty or face complete loss of the Campaign.  Instead, a handful of smaller kingdoms choose to band together against you.
     
    Phase 5 is Victory and Defeat.  The World is destroyed in a cataclysmic event as the Campaign comes to an end.  Your Kingdom emerges victorious, and you return to the Eternal Kingdoms to enjoy the spoils of war.   Your adversaries head home, too -- to lick their wounds. 
     

     
    No one quits.  Instead, both groups strategize on how to dominate the next Campaign.
     
    This is the experience we are trying to create.  Even if I lose, it won’t feel hollow.
     
    We saw a similar pattern emerge during the SB beta… by accident, not design.  Occasionally, changes to the game design would require us to wipe the world.  Every time it happened, I was worried that players would quit the game. Instead, we saw incredibly high peak concurrency numbers after each wipe.  Every time.  The “land rush” to grab the key positions in the new world was incredibly alluring.  If the world map was unique, I expect it would have been even more popular.
     
    The downside of this approach is that we don’t want the universe to feel too transitory.  That’s why we added the Eternal Kingdoms: super-sized player and guild housing Worlds.  Trophy rooms that you can use as a “lobby” between matches/campaigns. 
     
    (To make sure these Worlds don’t compete with the “main” game, i.e. the Campaign Worlds, we’ve completely stripped them of resource factories and anything but common reagents.  If you want to fill your trophy room, you have to go out and earn it.)
     
    This is the foundational change that we’ve made.  Crowfall isn’t an MMO with a “battle ground” strapped to the end of the level treadmill.  Crowfall isn’t a three-way tug of war that never resets.  It’s a real blend of a strategy game and an MMO.
     
    There’s more (a LOT more) to come, but it all starts with this basic idea:
     
    Eternal Heroes, Dying Worlds.
     
    Todd
    ACE
  16. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from gihunter6 in Shadowbane guilds going to dominate this game?   
    Why? It's not like SB players only ever play point & click games. Most of us have probably played every other game in the meantime, too, chasing that high we once felt. I'd actually prefer WASD movement (as long as we could still have group formations), but I'll take any interface. 
     
    And Play2Crush was what Shadowbane was originally called, so it's impossible not to draw a direct connection between them. Anyone expecting a softer experience than SB will (I hope) be disappointed. 
  17. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to savage in Please No Potions or Consumables   
    Please do not have potions or consumable buffs in this game. They detract from group play and give unnecessary advantages to those that farm/craft them all day long (grind). I want to win a fight because my team has more skill and coordination, not because we had more consumables stacked.
     
    Make players rely on one another for buffs to stats. Make that last second heal from your friend mean something; no "oh no" button to pop a potion.
     
    It appears there might be food in the game. If it restores health over time, fine, but make it only work out of combat.
     
    Thanks for reading this. Please discuss.
  18. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from mourne in Not wanting divisions within the community   
    I think there's an important difference between crushing opposing players in a game and interacting as civil people in a community for that game, especially when we're participating before there are many opportunities for real rivalries to develop between players and guilds. 
     
    I agree that extending wars to the forums and engaging in heated political "discussion" is a good thing and can be a game unto itself, but there will be a place for that. General discussion forums and the like should be places where we can all be constructive in helping to craft the game we'd all love to play. 
     
    And just because I may crush you in the future does not mean we can't be friends! 
  19. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from seventhbeacon in Not wanting divisions within the community   
    I think there's an important difference between crushing opposing players in a game and interacting as civil people in a community for that game, especially when we're participating before there are many opportunities for real rivalries to develop between players and guilds. 
     
    I agree that extending wars to the forums and engaging in heated political "discussion" is a good thing and can be a game unto itself, but there will be a place for that. General discussion forums and the like should be places where we can all be constructive in helping to craft the game we'd all love to play. 
     
    And just because I may crush you in the future does not mean we can't be friends! 
  20. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to integ in Shadowbane has ruined MMORPGS for me   
    The first time I ever logged into SB (after buying it on a whim and never having played an MMO before), I played it for 16 hours straight.  The level of immersion in the game's political structure and battle fronts seemed so real to me.  I was so invested in my guild, my teammates, the conflicts going on around us, and the knowledge that our actions in game truly mattered (within that sandbox lol...)  Nothing else has come even remotely close to the kind of experience SB provided.  I've tried Lineage II, LoL, GW2, been stuck in WoW for years (for lack of anything better to play), and have found that nothing has ever really filled that SB-shaped hole in my heart.
     
    I played SB at a unique time in my life when I had time to put in 14 hours a day on Mourning.  Those days are long gone, and as many of you have said, we've grown up now, have careers, families, marriages, and a whole lot less time.  And yet still...there's this unique SB-type itch that longs to be scratched.  Whatever happens with Crowfall, I'm sure I'll be an enthusiastic part of it, but I don't know to what degree.  That said, I can't wait to see what this world offers, aside from a serious challenge to my time-management skills.
  21. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to Anotherneko in The Farrum Wars - Chapter 1 : Wrath of the Gods   
    It was a hell of a day to be out in the field, where the cold hadn't frozen your armor to your body the wind snuck in and stole the warmth. Lips were blistered and cracked, skin chapped and dry, stomachs growled like packs of wolves ravenous for any content, and after their losses trying to even make a foothold enough to pitch camp their resources and morale were running dangerously low, yet there they all stood. The grizzled general looked over his troops, snorting plumes of steam from his nostrils as he sighed with frustration, looking over the shining battalion, a multitude of colorful clothing and flags clad in armor and ready to fight but … they were so young, and at the same time they already looked so tired.
     
    There was a weariness, he knew, that only war could embed in a person, an affliction of the soul that turns it to thoughts of home and make it ache like no wounding of the flesh ever could. This deprivation would seep from the mind to the body, weighing down sword arms, slowing down feet, making the body heavy until it refused to move any longer, and the victims heart failed. Rarely if ever did they die from this cold-borne infection alone, but there was a part deep inside of them that would never return to life, even long after the war had passed, and he could see the beginnings of the spread in their eyes. Some still twinkled brightly, some had dimmed with exhaustion, and in a few the light of home had already been extinguished.
     
    “You all have fought bravely.” He said it sternly, as he marched before the rows of his forces, making himself look as large as humanly possible, his radiant armor with it's carved reliefs and golden inlays was just as bloodied and dirt-caked as their own armored carapaces. “And the battle was bloody. I will not lie to you and say that we won it, but we showed those savage bastards what it is we're made of, and that we are not to be trifled with!” As his voice rose so too did those tired eyes of his forces, and he was deeply relieved by the rekindling of the flame in most of them. “Those that left us have engraved upon the hearts and minds of our enemies that we are not afraid, we will not back down. We were guided to these lands by the devine light and we will drive every one of those shadowy dogs from this promised land if it takes everything we've got!” Despite the fact that they were stone quiet it was impossible not to notice that the troops were standing a little taller, determination driving the cold from their stature. Heads were up, eyes were forward, he'd woken them up, and had their full attention. “Tomorrow, as it rises into the sky, the blessed sun will bare witness to our might as it bares down on upon the faithless dogs of these woods, and will you be standing there beside me!”
    “YES SIR!”
    “Will you raise your swords and voices to these heathens!”
    “YES SIR!”
    “Will you carve a new home the the promised land from the bones of our fallen enemies!”
    “YES SIR!”
    “Tomorrow we will be victorious! Tomorrow these lurking shadows will be driven into the light of judgement, and tomorrow this... promised... land... will... be … OURS!”
     
    Off to the side stood a bony looking assassin with golden-brown eyes and skin much darker than that of the troops. She adorned herself in dark browns and greens, though her vest and trousers had become quite dirty in the fray making the colors indistinguishable from each other. Besides her, looking solemnly over the field of combatants with her lips pursed into a dangerously thin line stood the priestess, her deep blue eyes already heavy with the confessions and pleas for strength she'd heard that day. She shared a sideways glance with the foreign onlooker, sent ahead of her people to help with the conflict. The message sent between them was silent, but mutual. They wandered away from the reinvigorated troops to a side tent that stood taller than the rest with a silky white ribbon tied to it's main pitch-rod. The camp had only been established recently, but the steaks had been planted good and deep, with the intent to stay. Both assassin and priestess ducked inside the makeshift chapel, and the light brown woman crossed her arms over her chest.
     
    “You sense it also.” She said quietly, tilting her head back to get a better view out of her one good eye. The other had been swollen shut by a blow taken during the unexpected skirmish they'd run into earlier in the day, and it looked as though the golden-eyed warrior may have also had a broken nose as blood saturated a little cotton plug meant to stem the flow. “The zeal of these people will lead them only to destruction, and their light will not be able to save them.”
     
    “Do not...” The priestess said quite firmly, holding up her open hand to stop her companion, her slender fingers and cramped and rigid as her sudden change in posture. “... call into question the power of the Devines.” She had had enough of everything, of the confessions of fear and sadness, the General who would not listen to her please for an act of diplomacy before action, and she wasn't about to suffer some immortal fool from another world questioning her faith. “If there is a message to be had they will send it, but until then this is where the blessed winds blew us and this is where we will stand our ground.”
     
    “Didn't sound much like General Frenzy was in a ground standing mood.” She retorted dryly. “He's talking about an invasion, Katherine. Everyone out there is going to die … at least once.” She added under her breath. “And my people will not make it here from Delve in time to stop it.”
     
    “Hopefully we will not need your pe....” She looked past the battered star-faring woman as the tent's opening flap rustled, and her lips clenched shut in that barely-tolerant grimace again. “General Frenzy.” She addressed him coolly. “To what do I owe the honor?”
     
    “The manor in which you took off after the rally...” He said quietly, taking up most of the entrance of the sanctuary tent, his massive shoulders rolled back to make him look more authoritative and proud. “... it set murmurs about. You have doubts in our assault on the morrow.” He was eyeing them like either one would explode with no notice, his heavily browed eyes and sharp, hooked nose not making his severe look any easier on either of them.
     
    “Just like I had doubts about your attack today, general.” The space farer turned to face him completely, dropping her arms to her side from having them crossed over her chest. She wore no conventional armor like the rest of his troops, instead thin plates of a foreign substance twice as hard as iron covered only what they needed to and the rest of her was exposed fabric, and her bare arms. “How many soldiers did you lose? A dozen? Two dozen? And just to a skirmish band.” She was a head shorter by comparison, but what she lacked in high she made up for in in stance, her feet apart, hands clenched into fists, ready to fight.
     
    “Enough with your poison Reis, you understand nothing of our plight, of our people, you're not one of us.” He growled it, leering down his nose at her and meeting her one good eye with both of his.
     
    “I have been in and amongst your people for years, General, over a decade.” she explained calmly, but her body language had hostile written all over it. Her back was straight as a dowel, her shoulders were back and she met his gaze with one that could have melted through a sheet of reinforced tritanium. “Which is why I came here, to help your people establish themselves in these lands, not take them over, not to fight a war for you, and certainly not to wipe out an indigenous people.”
     
    “People.” He laughed it darkly, going to spit before he remembered where he was. “Those aren't people, they're creatures. Faithless, mindless, shadow-dwelling monsters that will face the judgment of the light.”
     
    “No.” Katherine said firmly from behind the battered star-sailor. “They are human beings, also brought here by the devines.”
     
    “You've been listening to this capitalistic scum. Her poison's wormed it's way into your ears, Lady of Light.” He sounded so smug and full of himself suddenly that it took all Reis restraint not to ram her fist into his armored kidney.
     
    “On the contrary.” Katherine moved between the short warrior and the General with all the grace and power of a swan in flight, staring into his eyes for herself. “You have lost your way. The Devines do not punish their children with war, they would not pit one against the other as though in some grand jest. General, these are a people that we were destined to meet for a reason greater than than the sum of war.” He was quiet, taking a step back from the door as though the priestess had somehow grown in size. “And for you to go against the teachings of the Devines, to make war with another of their creations over land... look into my eyes and tell me this is not against everything we are taught!” Reis moved over to a seat and started unbuckling her armor, pulling off her boots and readying for the coming of the night as the two powers stared each other down in the fluttering opening of the tent. She'd hardly rest, and doubted anybody else would that night, but her armor was constricting enough to draw her attention for her deep and simmering hate of the general she had to obey.
     
    “Whether or not these 'creations' are that of the light....” He said it finally, quietly, dangerously, his voice little more than a gravely, dangerous, growl. “...We will let the Devines judge for themselves, tomorrow.” He thrust his arm out quickly behind him, sending the tent flap open with a dramatic flare as he went to exit. Sadly for him one of it's toggles became wedged in the elbow joint of his shimmering armor and he had to stop for a moment to clumsily tweeze it out with his fat fingers, muttering and cussing all the way out of ear shot and to the end of the row of tents where his much more luxurious one had been pitched. The two tents occupants looked at each other again and broke into uncontrollable giggles as they readied themselves to rest for the night. The coming dawn would be a trial.
     
    ---------
     
    “So, they plan to attack sunrise tomorrow.” Az'at sat with his hands on his knees, calloused fingers interlocking, his slender and pale face illuminated by the flickering flames and framed by his tooth and feather decorated hair. His three reconnaissance agents stood before him, all of them exhausted for having been watching the invaders camp for over a day. Two had been dispatched to camp in the elite-scouts absence, and he had several in the woods for good measure. They had fought hard that day, taking down the noisy invaders to their new found lands. They had not taken out as many as he would have liked, but the wounds his people had inflicted were deep and the metal shells would not soon forget. He looked up at the trio, who despite their fatigue were still quite alert. “And the troops are few, exhausted, and uneasy.”
     
    “Yes sir.” The first of them nodded, having made the initial report, his various hunting prizes and trophies suspended from his hair as well, clattering with the sudden motion.
     
    “The priestess, general, and their foreign pet had a heated discussion, though we couldn't get close enough to overhear.” Az'at inhaled deeply, taking the smokey twilight air to his core as another scout spoke. “It's believed they have a difference in opinion about the occupation of these lands.”
     
    “Hah.” He laughed it quickly sharply, leaning back so the few of his exposed features glimmered in the light, the rest hidden by his winter hides and furs. “What a sweet sentiment. We will surely be able to use that to our advantage if we can't crush them in their entirety tomorrow.” He picked a long pipe from inside his bulky parka, packed it from a bedazzled pouch, and lit it with a flaming branch, inhaling the slightly bitter smoke and blowing it out into the night's sky. “Never again will we suffer like we did at the hands of the C'in.” He spoke it quietly, soberly, and several of those around him lowered their heads as they remembered the swarm of foreign warriors swooping down on them in numbers that should have been impossible to amass. “We have found ourselves a new home, and I will see no fat, soft, squealing pig take it from us again.”
     
    “What about the words of the oracle?” One of the civilians asked from where they sat on a thick, mossy log, their dress and trophies visibly less grand and eye-catching than her leaders. “That the winds of change would need embracing.”
     
    “I care not for their mutterings.” He growled quietly, staring down the girl until she broke contact and lowered her gaze. “These fools attacked us out-right and with out warning. Are we supposed to embrace that?” His voice grew firmer, more loud with every syllable, until every conversation in the wooded camp had grown silent, and everybody was looking at him. “When they march into our camp tomorrow are we going to just hold our arms open so they can drive their swords through our chests?”
     
    “Azat...”
     
    “NO.” He whirled on the elderly councel member who'd spoken up. “No plush invader will be taking over our promised land. And if you're too afraid to face some ranting zealots then you can return to the smoldering void that was once our homeland and make your living there.” He was practically shouting, his neck muscles tensing and spasming with every word he barked. “The rest of us will stay, and we will fight for the land to which we were guided by the Air Gods themselves.”
     
    “Yeah!” Several of the older veterans looked around, frowing sagely as the younger members of the tribe pumped their fists into the moonlit sky and whooped excitedly. They had survived the wars these young ones could hardly remember, they were there at the beginning, and had fought through to the end, only to have it be for nothing when their home was destroyed by the mysterious powers of the N'et, all of it's life seemingly swallowed, and none would grow again.
     
    “May their Devines have mercy on them!” he crowed to the slow and silent moon as it trekked it's way across the sky above, the shocked portrait painted upon it's surface staring back into his own bright, crazed eyes. “FOR WE SHALL NOT!” He then rose from is position of power at the fire, fist still in the air, and those around him whooped and chanted with excitement, filling the frozen air with the heat of their dance and the call of their war songs. “Sharpen your blades brothers and sisters, starve the trolls tonight. Tomorrow there will be a feast of mayhem the likes of which history has never seen!”
     
    --------
     
    The sun refused to rise the next day, staying under it's blanket of clouds which threw a bitterly cold wind down onto the battlefield and pelted each side with stinging snow. With their glistening weapons of ebony and bronze in hand, the Az'ats lead their forces out of the shadow of the woods as the synchronized chanting became audible over the hill, where in display of all their splendor the forces of Caere B'haere marched in time. Each army had a following of trolls behind them, hulking creatures with a glazed look about them, beady eyes snapping to and fro over their enemy's forces, drooling absently in all the excitement as they dragged their knuckles along the ground behind them. Warriors on both sides gave these brutes a wide berth, as even a trained troll could do more collateral than a poorly aimed siege, and were known to be set off by the smallest things. The Caere B'haere's had the high ground, but the Az'ats had the cover, and both sides felt confident in their position enough to call taunts across the small, rocky meadow. They stared at each other for some time before General Frenzy stood forward from his troops, and Chief Az'at put some distance between himself and his people.
     
    “I, The General Frenzy of Caere B'haere, give you this one last chance to surrender!”
     
    “Surrender. Hah!” Chief Az'at looked over his shoulder at his people, the closest to him having heard him and laughed as well. “He want's us to surrender! What do you say to that!”
     
    “RELEASE THE TROLLS!” The shouted in a sudden chorus that excited and confused the dim beasts. War cries of “TRO-LO-LO-LO!” pierced the din as the dense creatures roared and lurched forwards into action.
     
    “The trolls!” General Frenzy drew his own blade, pointing it towards the advancing horde. “Loose the trolls!” Both armies advanced behind the slobbering monsters, their generals leading the charge as the trolls began exchanging blows in the center of the battlefield. For the clumsy beasts that they were they had a certain finesse when it came to impact, minor swings allowing them through the opposing forces guard to do maximum damage while they recovered, and the first flecks of thick, black, blood were sent flying onto the battle field as skin was broken and then torn into. The spectacle was so simultaneously horrifying and awe inspiring that some of the fresher forces of Caere B'haere stopped mid-charge to stare with their jaws open and their arms at their sides while others launched themselves forwards with such zeal they'd nearly closed the distance between the two warring leaders, and nobody was paying attention to the clouds. A vortex had begun to form above the heads of the warring Caere B'haeres and Az'ats, slowly at first, but only at first. Lightning lit up the snow-laden sky, there was a deafening roar as lances of blinding white light rained down from the heavens, exploding the ground at the center of the battlefield and throwing waves of soil and rock dozens of meters into the air. The following silence seemed to last for an eternity, as both sides tried to regain their bearings, and the strong, commanding voice finally boomed out of the sky.
     
    “MY CHILDREN... WHY DOYOU FIGHT? WHY DO YOU WAR OVER THESE LANDS I HAVE GIVEN YOU! YOU HAVE ANGERED ME MY CHILDREN, YOU HAVE TEMPTED MY WRATH FOR WHAT?!”
     
    “Laying it on a little thick there Todd?” In the trees on the far side of the battle, both her eyes open for the first time, crouched the chuckling capsulear dressed in freshly cleaned winter camo print, speaking into the small communications device sewn directly into her brain.
     
    “Remind me, who ordered a six man orbital strike on a bronze age civil war?” The amused voice chimed back as the forces below slowly got to their knees, some bowing down low, others raising their open hands towards the sky.
     
    “Praised be the light, it's the Devines....” Both the forces leaders, as well as every single last troll had been evaporated with out so much as a trace by the tactical lasers strapped to the six Destroyer class star ships orbiting thousands of miles above, and all that remained was a smoking crater twice as deep as any of the trolls had been tall.
     
    “The air gods...”
     
    “You gave us these lands! Would you see us forfeit it to these... creatures?!” One of the bolder warriors cried at the sky with all his might, raising his sword as if to take on the still agitated clouds. “After we lost our homes... and our families were scattered to the winds... SHOULD WE SUFFER THIS TOO?!”
     
    “I HAVE GU...”
     
    “OW!” Despite the fact that the booming voice was generated solely in her brain for her to hear she still clapped her hands over her ears like it'd help dull the volume. “Wrong feed! Wrong feed!” She whispered it harshly.
     
    “Crap... sorry...” There was a quiet pop as he switched to his atmosphere penetrating megaphones. “I HAVE GUIDED YOU HERE TO THIS LAND, TO THESE PEOPLE, IN THE HOPES THAT YOU WOULD GUIDE EACH OTHER FORWARDS INTO A FUTURE OF PROSPERITY, HAPPINESS, AND LONGEVITY.” The masses below were stony silent as he listened in through her ears for any sort of retort. Az'at and Caere B'haere were looking at each other as if seeing their opponents for the first time. It wasn't Todd's voice that rang out next, but that of an older night, preaching forgiveness while holding his hand up towards the void the planetary counter-measure team had blasted in the cloud cover. Reis smiled and lowered her binoculars, resting her forehead against the lenses, glad that this 'war' had at least been temporarily halted.
    “GO NOW MY CHILDREN, IN PEACE … FOR I SHALL NOT BE SO MERFICUL THE NEXT TIME YOU ENCOUR MY WRATH!”
     
    “Hamming it up a little up there?” Reis raised an eyebrow to the sky and got a skeptical laugh as a reply. Above the clouds, on the verge of space, the sky flickered and flashed a full spectrum of colors. “Oh ****, that's not Concord is it?” Her heart skipped a beat at the very thought of the New Eden police force discovering their little charade. If that was the case she could kiss her security status as well as her ride off the planet good-bye. The repercussions for messing with pre-space-flight races was enormous, and she could probably buy Todd a couple hundred more orbital strike ships with the bount on her head alone.
     
    “Just a hostile fleet engaging us, we're out of here.” She was so relieved that she face-planted right into the snow, groaning as it agetated what they'd confirmed as her broken nose, and she felt the hot dribble of blood and snot begin down face again as she let the icy cold snow on the ground soothe away the pain and her involuntary tears.
     
    “Praise be to Bob.” she breathed it as she raised her eyes to the sky once again, sure the giant orange burst of light that had the masses below scattering in all directions had been the death throws of somebodies ship. “I owe you guys big time, thank you so much.”
     
    “I'll be cashing in that IOU ASAP.” Todd grunted and she could hear him motoring his destroyer out of the gravity well of the planet, and out of her local communication range.
     
    “I'm counting on it.”
     
    ------------
     
    It was later that day, standing besides the massive crater into which both parties leaders had vanished, that the Az'ats and Caere B'haeres faced each other, hands clasped in accord as their newly elected representatives fleshed out the details about how the land was to be shared. Too deeply engrained had been the hate between the two camps to forget all together, even at the commandment of their deitys, and so the Az'Ats would recede their forces, families, and establishments to the southern borders of the newly christened lands of Farrum to the deep glades and wildlands of Avtopic, while General DeCousian would serve the Caere B'haere forces until they were able to establish several settlements in the region of Otergams.
     
    Secretly though, quietly and in whispers too low for even the wind to pick up, plans are being made for the day when the gods turned a blind eye to Farrum, their creations will rise to purge Farrum of the filth that has claimed it not realizing...
     
    they weren't the only one that saw the lights in the sky that day.
  22. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from blaze duskdreamer in Not wanting divisions within the community   
    I think there's an important difference between crushing opposing players in a game and interacting as civil people in a community for that game, especially when we're participating before there are many opportunities for real rivalries to develop between players and guilds. 
     
    I agree that extending wars to the forums and engaging in heated political "discussion" is a good thing and can be a game unto itself, but there will be a place for that. General discussion forums and the like should be places where we can all be constructive in helping to craft the game we'd all love to play. 
     
    And just because I may crush you in the future does not mean we can't be friends! 
  23. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to Jah in wp/sbg dev ppl   
    Reminds me of the "Wi Flag" in Asheron's Call.  It was long suspected by the players and strongly denied by the devs.  Eventually, the devs did find the bug and acknowledge the players were right all along.  Mobs really did have it out for certain players.
     
    I wonder if something similar was hiding in SB.
  24. Like
    voronwe eldalom got a reaction from destiny.star in Not wanting divisions within the community   
    I think there's an important difference between crushing opposing players in a game and interacting as civil people in a community for that game, especially when we're participating before there are many opportunities for real rivalries to develop between players and guilds. 
     
    I agree that extending wars to the forums and engaging in heated political "discussion" is a good thing and can be a game unto itself, but there will be a place for that. General discussion forums and the like should be places where we can all be constructive in helping to craft the game we'd all love to play. 
     
    And just because I may crush you in the future does not mean we can't be friends! 
  25. Like
    voronwe eldalom reacted to flex in Are we being too black and white with "MOBA"?   
    the distinction between a MOBA avatar of a male badger man, whom has a default combat style and abilities inherit to the badger man archtype, and with badger man having exclusive use of badger man abilities (say all of that 3 times fast)
     
    VS
     
    making a female half-orc ranger with 30 points into faith (or whatever), focusing on utility spells
     
    is a pretty pronounced distinction.
     
    Personally character development, coming up with new builds, trying new combinations is a big part of my enjoyment as it pertains to MMOs, MOBA archtypes remove that element in favor of Pokemon style premade options which limits personal choice, creativity, and development.
     
    imho
     
    Now, there is nothing wrong with MOBA archtypes, in a MOBA setting. Smash through a match in a competitive arcade environment, cool, got it.
     
    But in a persistant MMO world that is more than running a lane, I'd rather be able to independently develop a character of my own rather than be boxed into a rigid archtype.
     
    I'm not a roleplayer, at all, but again people seem to be forgetting about the RPG element of MMORPG, in which MOBA archtypes are less compatible than traditional character creation and development.
     
    The more I hear about what this community desires (and this is a very specialized community coming from a vairity of niche games) the more I'm sadly arriving at the conclusions that there will be a substantial incongruity between the wishful thinking of the community which gathered on this forum and what will be revealed at the end of the count down. We'll see. I hope I'm totally off base here.
×
×
  • Create New...