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Do Games Use Physics?


Keaggan
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So I was having a discussion with some other "arm chair" game designers about how physics work in games. This is a question to game engineers. Do games use real physics? If so is it a percentage based like taking the formula and tweaking it? The other side of this is that games actually use object collision which isn't physics. Since Wiki's aren't always trustworthy I bring this to you the people that actually know.

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They use magic.

 

But on a real note, they use equations based on real life physicals. So if they wanted to manipulate a equation on how far something would go if it got hit, they could do it a number of different ways. The quick and easy 6 off the top of my head would be gravity, potential energy, applied energy, mass, wind coefficient( or drag ), energy transfer efficiency. 

So its not as easy as increasing a percentage when you want a object to go farther. Its which part of the equation.

 

I would hazard to bet that NASA uses simulation software based off similar equations. 

Edited by Vectious

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I remember a blog post way back before HD 1.0 that talked about physics, but I forgot what the name of CF's physics engine was

Most games use "phake physics" which simulate real physics, I think. Like the PhysX engine, I think that's phake physics.

Edited by coolster50

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You Can't Be A Genius, If You Aren't The Slightest Bit Insane.

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7 hours ago, Keaggan said:

Do games use real physics?

Well, what is real physics? I mean, in the end it's all simulated physics when it comes to games, isn't it? They don't make your monitor jump around. :D

I know that the Voxel Farm engine used here already had some pretty good physics 3 years ago, though. Like for different weights, destruction and dynamic water.

Edited by Kraahk
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I guess one way of learning how physics in games work is looking up how they're built. If you have some understanding of code (or just maths & physics) you can browse through this and see how physics are simulated in games.

Generally speaking many games implement an already existing physics framework (e.g. bullet physics or Box2D for 2D games), engines like Unity or Unreal also have a built in system that handles physics. If devs are doing a custom physics solution it will probably be something as accurate as required and as fast as possible (= probably not really realistic) even if you know how it could be done better, because sophisticated realistic physics require a lot of processing power.

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