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narsille

Falling damage should be proportional to weight

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On 6/27/2017 at 10:28 AM, Gromschlog said:

in vacuum ;)

in air, mass, or better density has an effect as denser material gets less air resistance and therefore accelerates faster and reaches higher maxspeed.

however, as long as all races are made of flesh (hello stoneborn), their density is the same. Difference would of course be whats in the inventory. an plate-armed rat with alot of iron in its inventory is of course denser than an unarmored fae with nothing in its inventory.

stones fall faster than feathers outside of vacuum ;)

Feathers act like a parachute and are super light. People are a different story. If you try it with two objects heavy enough to overcome air resistance it works in air too. It's not the slightest bit hard to find proof, but I'll provide it for you anyway. 

 

 

Edited by Pixelmancer

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2 hours ago, Pixelmancer said:

Feathers act like a parachute and are super light. People are a different story. If you try it with two objects heavy enough to overcome air resistance it works in air too. It's not the slightest bit hard to find proof, but I'll provide it for you anyway. 

 

 

well, thanks for proving my point. car and wheel startet at the same height, yet when the car struck the floor the wheel was a bit less than a meter away.

at least, thats how the vid looked to me :P

if objects with nearly the same density get used for such an experiment, obviously the difference is very small. its still there.

and as I wrote: density is whats interesting, not pure weight.

(and the effect is small on dense material)

a stone or cannonball still drops faster than a football of the same weight or volume. you just only see it, if you let them drop a looong distance.

(the effect is practically irrelevant for characters in games as the height which makes a difference is deadly anyway, still, the effect is always there for objects with different density/shape).

If anything, an effect that does make a difference is, if a giant falls 2m and his legs are 5m long, thats not really falling for him, its just like doing a step. his muscles have no problem with that. if a mouse falls 2m, it gets hurt as its muscles are too weak and small to cushion. Different creatures react different to speed and power, even if they have the same speed or whatever. the falling speed for humanoids is affected by light resistance, but that is only then a big difference, if the falling height is deadly anyway and in that case density/shape and not weight makes the difference.

Edited by Gromschlog

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16 hours ago, Gromschlog said:

well, thanks for proving my point. car and wheel startet at the same height, yet when the car struck the floor the wheel was a bit less than a meter away.

at least, thats how the vid looked to me :P

if objects with nearly the same density get used for such an experiment, obviously the difference is very small. its still there.

and as I wrote: density is whats interesting, not pure weight.

(and the effect is small on dense material)

a stone or cannonball still drops faster than a football of the same weight or volume. you just only see it, if you let them drop a looong distance.

(the effect is practically irrelevant for characters in games as the height which makes a difference is deadly anyway, still, the effect is always there for objects with different density/shape).

If anything, an effect that does make a difference is, if a giant falls 2m and his legs are 5m long, thats not really falling for him, its just like doing a step. his muscles have no problem with that. if a mouse falls 2m, it gets hurt as its muscles are too weak and small to cushion. Different creatures react different to speed and power, even if they have the same speed or whatever. the falling speed for humanoids is affected by light resistance, but that is only then a big difference, if the falling height is deadly anyway and in that case density/shape and not weight makes the difference.

I dont think density is the correct word if you are trying to make your point. d = m/V so saying density affects free falling but weight (m) and volume (V) doesnt is kinda wrong.

Density is the key when talking if something floats or not. When the body density is waaaay higher than something it kinda becomes irrelevant. Kinda.

I think the word in question is probably aerodynamics. A cannonball will reach the ground faster than a perfect copy of the same cannonball that was magically stretched like a flat paper sheet.

It all is tied to the force the air makes when something tries to push it away. The force is the same no matter the object, the key point is area of contact and pressure. It is also tied with speed (that is how planes fly) and also not only the air below but all the forces around the object but we can ignore this here.

All in all if area of contact (some may argue this equal volume) is irrelevant i would choose weight as the next most important factor.

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On 6/29/2017 at 3:50 AM, Gromschlog said:

well, thanks for proving my point. car and wheel startet at the same height, yet when the car struck the floor the wheel was a bit less than a meter away.

at least, thats how the vid looked to me :P

if objects with nearly the same density get used for such an experiment, obviously the difference is very small. its still there.

and as I wrote: density is whats interesting, not pure weight.

(and the effect is small on dense material)

a stone or cannonball still drops faster than a football of the same weight or volume. you just only see it, if you let them drop a looong distance.

(the effect is practically irrelevant for characters in games as the height which makes a difference is deadly anyway, still, the effect is always there for objects with different density/shape).

If anything, an effect that does make a difference is, if a giant falls 2m and his legs are 5m long, thats not really falling for him, its just like doing a step. his muscles have no problem with that. if a mouse falls 2m, it gets hurt as its muscles are too weak and small to cushion. Different creatures react different to speed and power, even if they have the same speed or whatever. the falling speed for humanoids is affected by light resistance, but that is only then a big difference, if the falling height is deadly anyway and in that case density/shape and not weight makes the difference.

I didn't prove your point. I did the opposite. A football is basically a balloon. That's in no way comparable to a person. If you'll look at the part of the video I linked you'll see what you said only applies to ridiculously light objects like inflatable balls and feathers. Anything with a significant weight falls at the same speed, as the video illustrates with a tire and a car falling. As far as the guinecian physiology goes, have you ever seen a hamster fall? I've seen one walk right off a counter that was the equivalent of a 4 story fall and walk away like nothing happened. Those little bastards are practically indestructible for their size.

Edited by Pixelmancer

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6 hours ago, Pixelmancer said:

I didn't prove your point. I did the opposite. A football is basically a balloon. That's in no way comparable to a person. If you'll look at the part of the video I linked you'll see what you said only applies to ridiculously light objects like inflatable balls and feathers. Anything with a significant weight falls at the same speed, as the video illustrates with a tire and a car falling. As far as the guinecian physiology goes, have you ever seen a hamster fall? I've seen one walk right off a counter that was the equivalent of a 4 story fall and walk away like nothing happened. Those little bastards are practically indestructible for their size.

what I said applies to ALL objects. The effect is just MUCH more obvious and practically neglectable for dense objects. Its still there. Always.

A ton of feathers has the same weight like a ton of iron. still, as long as you dont compress it to the same volume, it falls slower.

aerodynamics can be ignored for dense objects and falling heights of less than 20m and everything above will be deadly anyway. that it can be ignored for practical reasons doesnt mean its not there. let a car and a truck fall from 10km height, and they will NOT hit the ground at the exact same time. its irrelevant to the game, but its real.

Edited by Gromschlog

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On 6/27/2017 at 0:20 AM, Pixelmancer said:

Freefall speed and acceleration are independent of mass.

F = ma

The force with which you hit the ground from a freefall is directly proportional to your mass.

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20 hours ago, R37ry said:

F = ma

The force with which you hit the ground from a freefall is directly proportional to your mass.

And that has anything to do with what I said how? 

MTG-ThreadNecromancer_3198.jpg

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5 minutes ago, R37ry said:

The damage is caused by the force of the impact, not the velocity.

Again, that has anything to do with what I said how? You quoted me talking about speed and acceleration.  Look man honestly I don't even know what this thread is about anymore. It's pretty old.

Edited by Pixelmancer

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Just now, Pixelmancer said:

Again, that has anything to do with what I said how? I was talking about speed and acceleration. 

So what does your comment have to do with the original post then?

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