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Kickstarter Incentives (Or Lack Thereof)


Tyroki
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No offense guys, but your incentives aren't really that incentivising until the $250 mark.

There is honestly no reason to go above the $40 point unless you're willing to go $250 or higher.

 

As amusing as an art book and digital soundtrack are, these are not a good enough reason to take a $5 loss on the $60 pledge. No really. $40 + VIP (So far priced at $15 per month) = $55. No digital art book or soundtrack are ever considered THAT big a deal. It's not like people are getting a physical art book out of it. The craftable cosmetic is a nice little touch, but I still don't think it's that incentivising for many people.

 

As it is, the $100 pledge loses about $15 in worth. Reserving a character name isn't enough to lose out on $15.

 

The $130 is kiiinda worth it, as it finally breaks even (and we don't know how much character slots will cost, though I can guarantee if they cost more than $15, most people will just say screw it)

 

There are also no real incentives in the stretch goals to help progress the project beyond the base goal. An FX guy would be nice, but while it supplies everyone with flashies to enjoy, it isn't much incentive for each individual to throw you another $5, or $10, or more. Female centaurs really only appeases a small but vocal crowd. Most people don't particularly care about that 'issue'.

 

Having mounts and caravans early is all well and good, but again, this doesn't help the individual. An incentive to get to this point would be "All players start with a badass saddle that makes any horse they ride a Nightmare" for example. Heck, even a saddle that makes everyone 5-10% faster is more incentivising than nothing. This is nice enough to allow people to get away from a sticky situation, but isn't overpowering in a world PVP setting.

 

Also, I'd like to point out that the gaps between stretch goals are larger than the standard fare. This is guaranteed to unsettle those who enjoy throwing money at a project to see how far the stretch goals will go. You're also only showing 2 stretch goals, so people don't know how far you're hoping for them to aim for.

 

As someone who has watched a lot of Kickstarters, and been part of a couple myself, I can guarantee you that more incentives = more money. As it is many realise this is a very dangerous project to back. Few publishers would touch this sort of game, because of how many risks are involved, unless you were willing to carve chunks out of your dream and set your vision on fire.

 

For publishers, their incentive to back a game is making large sums of money.

For the public, their incentive to back a game begins with getting access to a potentially cool game, then ends with shinies. As it is, you need to remember that many people are quite jaded these days thanks to the many Kickstarter abusers who either don't follow through, or don't supply the game promised by their vision and promises.

 

As it is, I really need to point out that your $30 Earliest Bird pledge is the best deal in there. Save $20 off the eventual market price. The sad part is, there simply wasn't enough of them to matter. Personally I think that should have been your basic pledge. You'd have gotten more people in. The $34 Early Bird is okay, and while it's nice that you keep adding numbers to that pledge, it will still unsettle new people introduced to the concept to see they have to spend $40 when those numbers run out and only get $10 off instead of $16 or $20.

 

There just aren't enough incentives in this kickstarter at all.

 

I'd like to show an example of a kickstarter that did quite well considering what it asked for:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cze/hex-mmo-trading-card-game

You'll notice that while Hex gave incentives out the bottom and lost future money, they also got a far greater initial influx of cash to get the game up and running. Yes, Hex is a completely different game to Crowfall. However, the kickstarter campaign is still a good example of what to do to get a large amount of backing. As it is, I know a good number of people who very much regret NOT backing it in time, as it was full of so much shiny. Heck, the forums even have threads of people who missed the kickstarter and want some other way to get access to that shiny. It was just that shiny. So shiny.

 

Simply put (and there is no better way of saying this), you need to kiss our asses as if we were the publisher. Because really we are, and we need our incentives. Afterall, it isn't like we're getting a slice of the pie to make up for the money spent like a publisher would. We don't get to make any of the rules like a publisher would, but we do get to decide how much backing you get. The more you kiss our butts with incentives, the more money we're likely to be willing to spend. Again, there is no better way to phrase this that I can think of. Again, you will lose future money off your current backers, but will get enough money to make the game worthwhile enough to attract more people.

 

 

 

Thread Suggestions

 

Kickstarter Extras: Crowfall Merchandise such as T-shirts, coffee mugs, posters of Uncle Bob and more (Uncle Bob needs YOU!!)

 

Cosmetics: Uncle Bobs Epic Warhat. Could be a crafting cosmetic for hats, or something you apply to your own character that overlays Uncle Bobs Warhat over your equipped helm. Could be Stretch Goal, Pledge Reward or a Purchaseable Kickstarter Extra.

 

Decorations: Epic CrowFall Battle Table based on the game of Risk for your Eternal Kingdom. Could have marble/stone/metal pieces based on the various Archtypes in the game. Heck, you could go a step further and have the Battle Table mirror the map of the Campaign World you're currently involved with. This could either be a Stretch Goal reward, Pledge Reward or a Purchasable Kickstarter Extra. 

 

Keep in mind Devs, you don't have to fulfill extra promises until the first patch, so long as you let people know that is what may happen.

 

And remember guys. Without us, Uncle Bob has no one to play with.

 

Uncle%20Bob_zpszkhgg5gx.png

 

He needs us to have a good time =D

 

Uncle%20Bob2_zpszgykzmtz.png

Edited by Tyroki
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I don't think the kick starter incentives need any embellishments, and the idea that only universally benefiting features should be pursued just ensures a very boring and unenjoyable game will be produced. A good game is full of unique features which both make each character more rich and the experience players have with others more rich. Happy consorts improve the population in general and in turn your experience.

 

I've seen popular games get less and less enjoyable as features become more and more general because a developer is only willing to offer what has the highest general benefit, it starts a vicious cycle where there is no special content for any feature in the game and it's just a bunch of bland BS...

 

So thanks for the female Centaurs that I don't want or care about and I hope other exclusive emphasis continues to show up throughout the game. Specifically Flying Fae.

a52d4a0d-044f-44ff-8a10-ccc31bfa2d87.jpg          Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes... Than if they're upset, they'll be a mile away, and barefoot :P

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eh, to each their own. My incentive was backing a project i believe in. I likely would have backed regardless of what the bonus items were.

 

Quoted for Truth cuz just liking it wasn't enough...

 

i think i trust the Dev's to have a better idea of how they want to do things than anyone else...but interesting analysis and opinion in the OP, worth pondering at the very least...

FIQw0eP.png

let the Code build the World and it's Laws....let the Players build the rest...

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the amount for me does not matter... I am backing a project I belive in, so I took a number I felt was finacially okey for me to do.

It does not matter what kind of rewards I am getting, my main reward is playing a game I helped fund.

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I need to point out that you guys would already be considered fans of the project at this point. You'd have backed anyway? That's great. No really, good on you. But that doesn't push the many people who are still on the fence in to deciding to back the project.

It's especially worse for those who have little money on a week by week basis. Good incentives help them to decide spending what money they have on the project is a good idea. Especially as they will get more than they would have out of it.

 

You also need to remember that many potential backers are quite jaded by kickstarter due to it's many past failures. A good amount of incentives also helps to alleviate this and push people in to giving it another try.

 

Again though. Many are going out on a limb here, and are being asked to trust. What reason do they have to go out on a limb, backing a project that while interesting, is also dangerous and risky? Most people simply aren't willing to back a risky project, even if it seems like a fun idea for one. What reason do people have to trust these devs and this project? Why should people pay money in good faith? There is currently little to look at. The majority of what currently exists are words explaining a vision with maybe a picture/gif or two. There simply isn't much to go on. People have 23 days left to consider whether this is worthwhile. Currently, it simply isn't.

 

I also don't like that you have to spend large amounts of money to up your alpha/beta standing. On it's own, that just isn't worth the extra money. That comes down to the whole "paying to test" thing which already bugs a good number of people. It's just not incentive enough.

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As someone who has watched a lot of Kickstarters, and been part of a couple myself, I can guarantee you that more incentives = more money. As it is many realise this is a very dangerous project to back. Few publishers would touch this sort of game, because of how many risks are involved, unless you were willing to carve chunks out of your dream and set your vision on fire.

 

Simply put (and there is no better way of saying this), you need to kiss our asses as if we were the publisher. Because really we are, and we need our incentives. Afterall, it isn't like we're getting a slice of the pie to make up for the money spent like a publisher would. We don't get to make any of the rules like a publisher would, but we do get to decide how much backing you get. The more you kiss our butts with incentives, the more money we're likely to be willing to spend. Again, there is no better way to phrase this that I can think of. Again, you will lose future money off your current backers, but will get enough money to make the game worthwhile enough to attract more people.

 

--------

 

OR be honest about what it cost to actually deliver the base product and it's stretch goals. I swear for every example you have there is a KS that over promised and stretched too far. I trust ACE to just tell the the truth about the priorities they have in correlation to the vision. Every one talks about the female centaur, like it's the big get of the first stretch goal and not the brand new employee/Eric plus his/her effects workload. Employees are expensive and the most important resource. 

Edited by skookum

Crowfall: The Official Game of

crowfallwiki.com

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The hard part is for us to look at an 'incentive' and KNOW what it means! Okay... how do I place a value on "Name-A-Fallen-Hero"? What does a "villa" look like, how big, any special function, etc... Things like VIP is something we can 'feel'. Guild reservations, extra parcels, and so on are tangible enough that we can sorta feel good about assigning them a value. Basically, we just need to know more about the game!

eEvERiW.jpg

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I'm with Tyroki on this one. I'm one of the people currently on the fence. In Reply to Mat'hir Uth Gan. Sure they got close to the 1mil marking fast, hell even within the first three days, but it sure has slowed down a bunch. They got the people who have been itching for a very long time to get an open PvP game and the only ones coming out semi close to this one is going to be Star Citizen and Camelot Unchained and look at how easily even those have been funded.

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I'm with Tyroki on this one. I'm one of the people currently on the fence. In Reply to Mat'hir Uth Gan. Sure they got close to the 1mil marking fast, hell even within the first three days, but it sure has slowed down a bunch. They got the people who have been itching for a very long time to get an open PvP game and the only ones coming out semi close to this one is going to be Star Citizen and Camelot Unchained and look at how easily even those have been funded.

Those games have been into Crowdfunding for Many Months already, in the Case of Star Citizen pretty sure they are a year+ of crowdfunding. Crowfalls has been open for about 5 days now. Lets get some perspective here.

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FTSIO

Ah, thank you. Bloody typo's.
 

 

 

As someone who has watched a lot of Kickstarters, and been part of a couple myself, I can guarantee you that more incentives = more money. As it is many realise this is a very dangerous project to back. Few publishers would touch this sort of game, because of how many risks are involved, unless you were willing to carve chunks out of your dream and set your vision on fire.

 

Simply put (and there is no better way of saying this), you need to kiss our asses as if we were the publisher. Because really we are, and we need our incentives. Afterall, it isn't like we're getting a slice of the pie to make up for the money spent like a publisher would. We don't get to make any of the rules like a publisher would, but we do get to decide how much backing you get. The more you kiss our butts with incentives, the more money we're likely to be willing to spend. Again, there is no better way to phrase this that I can think of. Again, you will lose future money off your current backers, but will get enough money to make the game worthwhile enough to attract more people.

 

--------

 

OR be honest about what it cost to actually deliver the base product and it's stretch goals. I swear for every example you have there is a KS that over promised and stretched too far. I trust ACE to just tell the the truth about the priorities they have in correlation to the vision. Every one talks about the female centaur, like it's the big get of the first stretch goal and not the brand new employee/Eric plus his/her effects workload. Employees are expensive and the most important resource. 

 

 

I agree that the FX guy is important. I was actually surprised to see they didn't have one. Most of us don't even CARE about the female centaur thing. But them getting a better FX guy, while good for the final result, just isn't enough to push people toward putting money in to this project. As it is, apparently getting the new FX guy is worth 200k, yet mounts/caravans are worth 300k? Abuh?

 

 

The hard part is for us to look at an 'incentive' and KNOW what it means! Okay... how do I place a value on "Name-A-Fallen-Hero"? What does a "villa" look like, how big, any special function, etc... Things like VIP is something we can 'feel'. Guild reservations, extra parcels, and so on are tangible enough that we can sorta feel good about assigning them a value. Basically, we just need to know more about the game!

But I feel this simply won't happen during the course of the Kickstarter. We won't really know all the details we need until some time after the kickstarter, which makes it still far too risky to back as we ourselves have no knowledge of the value of the pledge rewards.

Again, we also have no incentive to push for the stretch goals. In a single player game, content makes for a great stretch goal as it gives more to do, but for MMOs, stuff is usually the best incentive alongside content. Even if that stuff has no actual power value and is nothing more than cosmetic, people will still feel it's more worthwhile. They get to look cool for backing something, at least if the game doesn't end up a failure.

 

 

I'm with Tyroki on this one. I'm one of the people currently on the fence. In Reply to Mat'hir Uth Gan. Sure they got close to the 1mil marking fast, hell even within the first three days, but it sure has slowed down a bunch. They got the people who have been itching for a very long time to get an open PvP game and the only ones coming out semi close to this one is going to be Star Citizen and Camelot Unchained and look at how easily even those have been funded.

Agreed, though for those examples, Camelot Unchained barely made it past the base goal, and Star Citizen is based in a genre that a large number of people really want more games of. Star Citizen did incentivise more than Crowfall though, and in the end, their personal backer program has given people who got in early so much stuff.
 

 

Those games have been into Crowdfunding for Many Months already, in the Case of Star Citizen pretty sure they are a year+ of crowdfunding. Crowfalls has been open for about 5 days now. Lets get some perspective here.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cig/star-citizen

Incentives and gained a lot of money past their base goal. Yes, Star Citizen has their own personal backer program which they set up post Kickstarter, but their initial kickstarter only went for the standard month.

Camelot Unchained's original kickstarter asked for 2 mil as the base goal and only made it to 2.2 mil. There weren't many incentives, and their niche as a PVP only game has always been risky territory. But this brings up something else. Camelot Unchained already exists in the territory that Crowfall seeks to enter. PVP only. A fair number of PVPers have already backed CU. It's also being made by the guys behind Dark Age of Camelot, which was an incredibly popular game. They already have a really good name, and were quite well known.

The problem with devs from Shadowbane is, most people of today that want a full PVP game don't even know it existed. Yes, some of the devs for Crowfall have been a part of other well known games, but for me, the only dev on that team I vaguely know about, and only from his work, is the guy behind the Beastmaster system for Star Wars Galaxies. One dev. Out of many. And we don't even know if he's making similar amazing systems. Knowledge alone can't help them with this kickstarter, and all of the people who did already know about these guys, are onboard. This is why they've made it to the goal, but barely beyond.

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The problem with devs from Shadowbane is, most people of today that want a full PVP game don't even know it existed.

 

 

(quote system buggy, couldn't fix the error)

So they know the dev from Dark Age of Camelot but not the devs from UO and Shadowbane? Doesn't sound like a concensus of PvPers, both new and old.

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Those games have been into Crowdfunding for Many Months already, in the Case of Star Citizen pretty sure they are a year+ of crowdfunding. Crowfalls has been open for about 5 days now. Lets get some perspective here.

I understand that these games have been in crowdfunding for many months in the case of Star Citizen almost four years. But my previous statement still applies. I am on the fence because as Tyroki has said about the incentives it isn't enough. While I can understand and appreciate the fact that you have backed this purely on the concept of what it is that is an admirable trait but not many of us are willing to go of pure faith alone. I have seen lots of kickstarters and played more MMO's than I can count or even remember the names of. There isn't much reason to pay more than the 34 dollars. Even though I do like this games concept. Simply there isn't enough incentives.

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And I've seen alpha and beta appear once on this thread. While the OP doesn't provide monetary value to alpha/beta invite, CU obviously did have that exact same incentive on that KS campaign that you praise yet you attached no additional value to CF's alpha/beta here. What team are you on?

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No offense guys, but your incentives aren't really that incentivising until the $250 mark.

There is honestly no reason to go above the $40 point unless you're willing to go $250 or higher.

 

As amusing as an art book and digital soundtrack are, these are not a good enough reason to take a $5 loss on the $60 pledge. No really. $40 + VIP (So far priced at $15 per month) = $55. No digital art book or soundtrack are ever considered THAT big a deal. It's not like people are getting a physical art book out of it. The craftable cosmetic is a nice little touch, but I still don't think it's that incentivising for many people.

 

As it is, the $100 pledge loses about $15 in worth. Reserving a character name isn't enough to lose out on $15.

 

The $130 is kiiinda worth it, as it finally breaks even (and we don't know how much character slots will cost, though I can guarantee if they cost more than $15, most people will just say screw it)

 

There are also no real incentives in the stretch goals to help progress the project beyond the base goal. An FX guy would be nice, but while it supplies everyone with flashies to enjoy, it isn't much incentive for each individual to throw you another $5, or $10, or more. Female centaurs really only appeases a small but vocal crowd. Most people don't particularly care about that 'issue'.

 

Having mounts and caravans early is all well and good, but again, this doesn't help the individual. An incentive to get to this point would be "All players start with a badass saddle that makes any horse they ride a Nightmare" for example. Heck, even a saddle that makes everyone 5-10% faster is more incentivising than nothing. This is nice enough to allow people to get away from a sticky situation, but isn't overpowering in a world PVP setting.

 

Also, I'd like to point out that the gaps between stretch goals are larger than the standard fare. This is guaranteed to unsettle those who enjoy throwing money at a project to see how far the stretch goals will go. You're also only showing 2 stretch goals, so people don't know how far you're hoping for them to aim for.

 

As someone who has watched a lot of Kickstarters, and been part of a couple myself, I can guarantee you that more incentives = more money. As it is many realise this is a very dangerous project to back. Few publishers would touch this sort of game, because of how many risks are involved, unless you were willing to carve chunks out of your dream and set your vision on fire.

 

For publishers, their incentive to back a game is making large sums of money.

For the public, their incentive to back a game begins with getting access to a potentially cool game, then ends with shinies. As it is, you need to remember that many people are quite jaded these days thanks to the many Kickstarter abusers who either don't follow through, or don't supply the game promised by their vision and promises.

 

As it is, I really need to point out that your $30 Earliest Bird pledge is the best deal in there. Save $20 off the eventual market price. The sad part is, there simply wasn't enough of them to matter. Personally I think that should have been your basic pledge. You'd have gotten more people in. The $34 Early Bird is okay, and while it's nice that you keep adding numbers to that pledge, it will still unsettle new people introduced to the concept to see they have to spend $40 when those numbers run out and only get $10 off instead of $16 or $20.

 

There just aren't enough incentives in this kickstarter at all.

 

I'd like to show an example of a kickstarter that did quite well considering what it asked for:https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cze/hex-mmo-trading-card-game

You'll notice that while Hex gave incentives out the bottom and lost future money, they also got a far greater initial influx of cash to get the game up and running. Yes, Hex is a completely different game to Crowfall. However, the kickstarter campaign is still a good example of what to do to get a large amount of backing. As it is, I know a good number of people who very much regret NOT backing it in time, as it was full of so much shiny. Heck, the forums even have threads of people who missed the kickstarter and want some other way to get access to that shiny. It was just that shiny. So shiny.

 

Simply put (and there is no better way of saying this), you need to kiss our asses as if we were the publisher. Because really we are, and we need our incentives. Afterall, it isn't like we're getting a slice of the pie to make up for the money spent like a publisher would. We don't get to make any of the rules like a publisher would, but we do get to decide how much backing you get. The more you kiss our butts with incentives, the more money we're likely to be willing to spend. Again, there is no better way to phrase this that I can think of. Again, you will lose future money off your current backers, but will get enough money to make the game worthwhile enough to attract more people.

Ladies and gentlemen, I give to you, from the dark realms of the human mind...

 

One...

Man's...

Opinion!

 

*clap clap clap clap clap*

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So they know the dev from Dark Age of Camelot but not the devs from UO and Shadowbane?

 

Yes, because DAoC was MASSIVELY popular, and UO and SB were downright ancient.

 

On the point of incentives, I got in on the early bird for the Amber pledge, right now i'm feeling shoehorned into not being able to back down because I feel it's the only one WORTH pledging for, past the Arcane weapon skins.

 

Edit: And to be completely honest, I had never even HEARD of Shadowbane before this kickstarter. I pledged because of the dev from Star Wars Galaxies and his work on the Creature Handler.

Edited by ViridianDrake
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No offense guys, but your incentives aren't really that incentivising until the $250 mark.

There is honestly no reason to go above the $40 point unless you're willing to go $250 or higher.

 

As amusing as an art book and digital soundtrack are, these are not a good enough reason to take a $5 loss on the $60 pledge. No really. $40 + VIP (So far priced at $15 per month) = $55. No digital art book or soundtrack are ever considered THAT big a deal. It's not like people are getting a physical art book out of it. The craftable cosmetic is a nice little touch, but I still don't think it's that incentivising for many people.

 

As it is, the $100 pledge loses about $15 in worth. Reserving a character name isn't enough to lose out on $15.

 

The $130 is kiiinda worth it, as it finally breaks even (and we don't know how much character slots will cost, though I can guarantee if they cost more than $15, most people will just say screw it)

 

There are also no real incentives in the stretch goals to help progress the project beyond the base goal. An FX guy would be nice, but while it supplies everyone with flashies to enjoy, it isn't much incentive for each individual to throw you another $5, or $10, or more. Female centaurs really only appeases a small but vocal crowd. Most people don't particularly care about that 'issue'.

 

Having mounts and caravans early is all well and good, but again, this doesn't help the individual. An incentive to get to this point would be "All players start with a badass saddle that makes any horse they ride a Nightmare" for example. Heck, even a saddle that makes everyone 5-10% faster is more incentivising than nothing. This is nice enough to allow people to get away from a sticky situation, but isn't overpowering in a world PVP setting.

 

Also, I'd like to point out that the gaps between stretch goals are larger than the standard fare. This is guaranteed to unsettle those who enjoy throwing money at a project to see how far the stretch goals will go. You're also only showing 2 stretch goals, so people don't know how far you're hoping for them to aim for.

 

As someone who has watched a lot of Kickstarters, and been part of a couple myself, I can guarantee you that more incentives = more money. As it is many realise this is a very dangerous project to back. Few publishers would touch this sort of game, because of how many risks are involved, unless you were willing to carve chunks out of your dream and set your vision on fire.

 

For publishers, their incentive to back a game is making large sums of money.

For the public, their incentive to back a game begins with getting access to a potentially cool game, then ends with shinies. As it is, you need to remember that many people are quite jaded these days thanks to the many Kickstarter abusers who either don't follow through, or don't supply the game promised by their vision and promises.

 

As it is, I really need to point out that your $30 Earliest Bird pledge is the best deal in there. Save $20 off the eventual market price. The sad part is, there simply wasn't enough of them to matter. Personally I think that should have been your basic pledge. You'd have gotten more people in. The $34 Early Bird is okay, and while it's nice that you keep adding numbers to that pledge, it will still unsettle new people introduced to the concept to see they have to spend $40 when those numbers run out and only get $10 off instead of $16 or $20.

 

There just aren't enough incentives in this kickstarter at all.

 

I'd like to show an example of a kickstarter that did quite well considering what it asked for:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cze/hex-mmo-trading-card-game

You'll notice that while Hex gave incentives out the bottom and lost future money, they also got a far greater initial influx of cash to get the game up and running. Yes, Hex is a completely different game to Crowfall. However, the kickstarter campaign is still a good example of what to do to get a large amount of backing. As it is, I know a good number of people who very much regret NOT backing it in time, as it was full of so much shiny. Heck, the forums even have threads of people who missed the kickstarter and want some other way to get access to that shiny. It was just that shiny. So shiny.

 

Simply put (and there is no better way of saying this), you need to kiss our asses as if we were the publisher. Because really we are, and we need our incentives. Afterall, it isn't like we're getting a slice of the pie to make up for the money spent like a publisher would. We don't get to make any of the rules like a publisher would, but we do get to decide how much backing you get. The more you kiss our butts with incentives, the more money we're likely to be willing to spend. Again, there is no better way to phrase this that I can think of. Again, you will lose future money off your current backers, but will get enough money to make the game worthwhile enough to attract more people.

And your point is?

288mqgz.png

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(quote system buggy, couldn't fix the error)

So they know the dev from Dark Age of Camelot but not the devs from UO and Shadowbane? Doesn't sound like a concensus of PvPers, both new and old.

 

Look. I'm in my late 20's. I'm getting far too close to 30 for comfort.

When UO and Shadowbane came out, I myself didn't care for those sorts of games.

It wasn't until after Dark Age of Camelot met it's death that I started to really enjoy PVP.

I since regret having not been very interested in world scale PVP back then.

 

However, in the new age, many people don't even know about Shadowbane. UO, sure. Who hasn't heard of UO? Even today it's often referenced, and the Ultima series is a sizeable part of gaming history. But of the countless, often now nameless MMO's I've been part of in my life of doing nothing else, UO just didn't interest me back then.

 

That being said, I myself actually do know of Shadowbane. But I know many who have already asked me "The hell is Shadowbane? You mean Shadowrun, right?" Back then I'd tried Shadowbane, but as I've already said, I didn't get in to that sort of game until after most of those sorts of games were dead and decaying. So I didn't enjoy Shadowbane, or at least it's concepts, until long after it's lifespan.

 

And I've seen alpha and beta appear once on this thread. While the OP doesn't provide monetary value to alpha/beta invite, CU obviously did have that exact same incentive on that KS campaign that you praise yet you attached no additional value to CF's alpha/beta here. What team are you on?

Sure. And as the OP, I also mentioned further in to the thread after CU was brought up as an example (even if the person used it to support my OP), that CU didn't give many incentives. They got to their goal based mostly on the fact that people loved their previous game (at least before publisher involvement carved chunks away).

 

What team am I on, you ask? Team Fence.

Personally I'm very much in agreement with Legionnaire. I'm simply not willing to go beyond the $34 early bird, should I even bother with that. As someone without much in the way of money on a week by week basis (yeeup, I'm an example of the poor in the OP), I'm still not sold on this being worth it. Don't get me wrong. I love the vision. But this is an incredibly risky venture, and you'd have to be a fool to not see that.

 

Edit: I'm on the team that wants to see this game and the other games succeed. I will probably play all of them. What matters right now is what will see Crowfall succeed far beyond it's base goal. The devs have a fairly large team by non-publisher dev standards, especially for an MMO (Yes, they could be a lot bigger and would otherwise be considered small. I realise this).

 

 

Ladies and gentlemen, I give to you, from the dark realms of the human mind...

 

One...

Man's...

Opinion!

 

*clap clap clap clap clap*

Thank you for not taking this seriously. I find it unfortunate that you can't share in a worthwhile discussion.

Edited by Tyroki
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