Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Complex In Depth Crafting - Specialty "secret" Crafting Recipes


DraceR
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm just listened to Crowns and Crows ( http://www.twitch.tv/crownsandcrows ) and an interesting topic came up. 

 

The idea of hidden crafting recipes which would allow crafters to experiment and find cool things.

 

I personally love the idea as this could really allow crafters to experiment and find some neat stuff. This would also open up a new way to specialize.

 

What do you guys think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that any hidden recipe is going to rapidly disseminate across the Crowfall worlds. They may stay secret for short times, but not for long.

 

This is of course unless they make a ridiculously difficult system to test by trial and error, a la Diablo 2 runeword system.

We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of dreams.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made a post on this before.

 

One way that you can add complexity to secret recipes is by adding non-resource components.

 

Examples would be, crafting an item with specific ore, in the correct slots, during a specific hour of the day....while in another players EK.

 

You could do this effectively by coming up with a list of rule-sets and randomizing those rules across your secret recipes.

 

People would quickly find the easier recipes but, due to the complexity of some recipes, they may never be found at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Due to wikis nothing will be secret for long but I think that if we did have very complex crafting system which includes hidden recipes than it could promote specialization. I don't think many crafters would be eager to share their secret recipes.

 

Also the idea about location specific recipes might be an interesting concept.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We definitely needed yet another thread on this topic.

Official "Bad Person" of Crowfall

"I think 1/3rd of my postcount is telling people that we aren't turning into a PvE / casual / broad audience game." -

Tully

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We definitely needed yet another thread on this topic.

I'm sorry, but I believed this concept should be discussed more. Also, I didn't see any posts specially about "secret" recipes. I guess that's my mistake.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

We definitely needed yet another thread on this topic.

 

Having multiple posts on a fairly broad subject isn't really a bad thing.  I enjoy seeing multiple people's comments about a similar subject.  Instead of policing for double posts maybe you could include your thoughts Jihan? (even if it's for a second or third time)

dG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Situational crafting is a really cool idea.  Maybe when your next to a powerful creature and you craft a sword with certain ingredients, it imbues some of the mosters aura in it, kinda like soul gems in Elder scrolls.

dG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But aren't recipes already collectable?

 

Wouldn't "access" already be restricted?

 

That said the only way to make anti-wiki crafting is by per account seed keys used in complex algorithms.

 

This way you find your own equation that you have to experiment with to find your maximum effectiveness or unlock special recipes or attributes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a slippery slope.  The way SWG throttled access to the uber duber recipes was either by attaching the learning to a quest line or throwing in a very heavy handed dose of RNG.  Since there's no quest lines in CF, that leaves the RNG unless our big kid devs can up the level of crafting and come up with a better throttle.

 

RNG throttling looks like this. To keep to the Firespray example (and since my notes are still out from the last Firespray frenzy of info), to get the schematic for the Firespray you had to reverse engineer space junk and parts until you got a piece of the schematic.  Whether you got one was completely dependent on the RNG, which reset each time you reverse engineered something.  You needed to collect 8 of these "disc fragments" then combine them using another crafting machine to get a temporary schematic to build a few Firesprays.

 

Getting all 8 fragments took thousands of pieces of space junk.  It was a very effective throttle - Firesprays were rare- but it was a pretty ridiculous process. 

 

If I had to choose between letting the gathering of resources and combination thereof be the bar for being a skilled crafter vs. a secret recipe collection that relied on an RNG throttle, I'd go with the former.   I specialized in Firesprays in SWG but that schematic reverse engineering holds no nostalgia for me.

pixS8Wt.jpg


The Chronicles of Crowfall           The Free Lands of Azure            RIP Doc Gonzo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like the game to support a character who wants to primarily be a crafter.  In order to achieve this, I think several things are needed.

 

  1. As a PvP game, the game needs to be focused more on skill, decision and strategy and less on gear dependency.
  2. This means making even high-end game gear accessible to the average player.  Not super easy, but still accessible.  For instance, an average player should be able to obtain high-end gear 1/2 to 2/3 of the way through a given campaign.  This allows a heavier focus on PvP and less on item/money grind.
  3. Items should decay and eventually break.  Repairs can keep them longer, but will still eventually break.  This will push a player driven economy.

Here is a basic example of a crafting system that is more choice based than recipe based: 

  1. Open crafting menu.
  2. Under will be given specific choices.  Lets say you are a blacksmith:  You choose "Weapons."
  3. You are prompted by different weapon choices.  You choose "Sword."
  4. You choose a type of sword.  Different sword have different base stats (damage, speed, durability, etc.).  You choose "Claymore."
  5. The recipe for Claymore is 1 wood and 4 ingots.  If you create it, you have a % chance to create it.
  6. Depending on what type of wood/ingots you use will give the sword different stats.  
  7. Depending on player skill will give you its durability.
  8. The higher level materials or more stats you give the sword, the higher difficulty it is to make.

The system is simple, easy to use, but still difficult to make higher-end items.  It also allows end-game items with different stat choices which can be requested by the client to the crafter.  There can be many other modifiers, but you get the general jist.  It is simple enough to let the game be more focused on PvP rather than on grinding for super rare mats or recipes.  Simple, but still enjoyable and keeps crafters in constant demand. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The "secretness" of recipes could be maintained by at least partially randomizing the properties of materials and/or the specifics of recipes in different campaigns. Sure, people would keep discovering all the things, and sharing them. But, you couldn't really share them across campaigns, and once a given campaign was over, your exact knowledge of the whole system would become inexact.

This post brought to you by...
Lephys. Because everything's better with a smile facepalm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only long-lasting version of secret recipes that I've experienced was the per-player unique recipes in Asheron's Call. They used a pretty simplistic mechanism to randomize them so it was eventually decoded and people could just enter some character data to determine what their personal version of every recipe would be. There are ways around that, though. The easiest being for the seed for the randomizer to not be a public stat :)

 

It was quite fun, though. 

 

CopperStall

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only long-lasting version of secret recipes that I've experienced was the per-player unique recipes in Asheron's Call. They used a pretty simplistic mechanism to randomize them so it was eventually decoded and people could just enter some character data to determine what their personal version of every recipe would be. There are ways around that, though. The easiest being for the seed for the randomizer to not be a public stat :)

 

It was quite fun, though. 

 

CopperStall

 

Thats what I was riffing off when I wrote the below. As long as the seed isn't based on public data and is never transmitted to the client it should stay secure.

 

 

Seperate materials into three classes: basics like metal and leather set the main stats and are the main structure, modifiers are common items that add bonus stats, intensifiers are rare items that boost the size of the stats.

 

A recipe would consist of some basic components like metal. You can pick the type of metal to give base stats. To each recipe you could add two modifier components and one intensifier but they're optional. You'd be able to cheaply experiment with various combinations of modifier to see what the outcome is because those are common components. Then when you find one that is worth it you add an expensive intensifier and get the same stats, but bigger numbers.

 

To stop this from getting wikied each character would have the mapping between resulting bonuses and the modifiers randomly determined at creation. Everyone would get access to all of the bonuses, but the inputs to get them would be different for everyone so you couldn't just google what to do. If you want to make a frost resistance robe you'd need to experiment until you found out how.

 

On the plus side I'm way more likely to care who is crafting my stuff now because a dabbler won't have found everything I want. Crafting would require effort so an alt would probably be worse at it than a main. On the minus side there would need to be a lot of possible combinations to ensure that brute forcing your way through all of the would be a real investment of time and materials. Thats a big chunk of developer effort. It'd also be quite random, not everyone will like it. Still I think this is pretty decent at meeting the design goals without making the actual crafting process require skill.

David Sirlin's Balancing Multiplayer Games should be mandatory reading for all gamers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...