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courant101

Remark & Questions About The Lore

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1. Some Achetypes' backstory fits well with one gender but not with the other :

  • Champion : I was a kid when I was made a 'Sir.' Noble blood? Pshaw! Me da’ was a butcher. Some say I’m not far off.                                            I win because I’m stronger, and I’m willing to do what other men won’t.
  • Ranger : To be blunt, most men haven’t the stones for it.
  • Templar : Once I dreamed of being a Princess. It didn’t work out.                                                                                                                               Father tried to marry me to a noble, but I wouldn’t have it.                                                                                                                                     We were the first females sanctified since the Beggar’s Crusade – but certainly not the last.
  • Frostweaver : Xaluara Dane, Frostweaver and Witch-wife, Scion of Caer Correina and Thrall-maiden of the Prince with Four Faces.
  • Legionnaire : My name is Gaius Aurelius. I was bred to be a warrior, and I did not disappoint.                                                                                    I, Gaius Aurelius, took for my wife Cloelia Iulianus, Jewel of the Empire, She Who Could Not Be Tamed.                                                                I sired four sons: warriors, all. I take pride in knowing they were mine.

 

2. After reading this interview about Crowfall Pantheon, more particularly those 2 Q&A :

 

What role do the players take in this War?

 

When a great hero dies, they are approached by the Gods with an offer: accept the emptiness of death or accept eternal servitude as an immortal Champion.

These immortals are really a cross between a “champion” and a “grim reaper.” The mortals fear them, and see them as scavengers and harbingers of doom. They call them “Crows.”

 

How do the Crows fight for the Gods?

 

Basically, the Crows are sent to the Dying Worlds – the Worlds that have already been infected by the Hunger, and therefore soon to be destroyed – and to conquer it on behalf of one God, or one Faction (Order, Chaos or Balance).

In addition, they are to collect the Souls of the Damned and bring them back in sacrifice. These Worlds are haunted, so the only sentient creatures left are the trapped souls of mortals who have died.

Those souls act like a currency, of sorts – and as rare reagents. Once collected, master crafters can

“bind” these spirits into magic items, imbuing them with arcane powers.

 

I was wondering about the part in bold : what is the motivation of the Gods to conquer soon to be destroyed Worlds?

 

 

3. In the War of the Gods text, we can read : 

 

14 And yet his work was not yet done. 15 He bent the great tail of Lyessa, twisting it unto itself til the arch of her spine formed the Heavens above 16 and thus was the Sky given substance, and form. 17 The stars appeared in the glinting on her scales and her breath became the eastern wind. 18 He stole Yaemir’s fire, and hung it in the western Sky. 19 He called this work the Sun. 20 He stole Lyessa’s unborn, placing her egg at the eastern edge of Heaven. 21 And he called this work the Moon. 22 The King of Snakes dared not move, for fear his wife would be broken. 23 The Queen of Wyrms dared not move, lest the Sky collapse and her children perish.

 

How would the King of the Snakes' wife be broken if he dared to move? I already asked the question in Q&A some time ago.

Edited by courant101

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In the Druid backstory there is a part where they try and explain the Hunger.

Do they know more about the Hunger because they are somehow connected to Gaia?

Is it perhaps an anti-Gaia? (Gaia = life, Hunger = destruction of life)

 

Was wondering this as the Hunger is a major entity in the game yet not much is known about it.


"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

A solid quote, I'd say.

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1. Some Achetypes' backstory fits well with one gender but not with the other :

 

I think each back-story should be considered the story of just one individual member of that archetype.  They are just examples to establish the theme.  Not all champions know Lord Barstow, not all Fae Assassins had twin brothers, and so on.

 

We won't be playing those individuals.  The back stories provided don't really apply to our characters. We presumably have our own stories to tell.

 

This contrasts with the "Champions" in a MOBA like LoL, where you pick a named individual to play.  Crowfall archetypes don't work that way.

Edited by jah

IhhQKY6.gif

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I think each back-story should be considered the story of one individual.  They are just examples to establish the theme.  Not all champions know Lord Barstow, not all Fae Assassins had twin brothers, and so on.

 

We won't be playing those individuals.  The back stories provided don't really apply to our characters. We presumably have our own stories to tell.

Or every Ranger really hates the cold just because they choose to become a Ranger.

"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

A solid quote, I'd say.

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I think each back-story should be considered the story of one individual.  They are just examples to establish the theme.  Not all champions know Lord Barstow, not all Fae Assassins had twin brothers, and so on.

 

We won't be playing those individuals.  The back stories provided don't really apply to our characters. We presumably have our own stories to tell.

 

That makes a lot of sense yea. Still, I think it would look weird for a player to pick a male Templar and then read the "dreaming of being a princess" part in the backstory.  :P

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That makes a lot of sense yea. Still, I think it would look weird for a player to pick a male Templar and then read the "dreaming of being a princess" part in the backstory.  :P

Why is that?

Can't men dream of becoming princesses? ^^


"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

A solid quote, I'd say.

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That makes a lot of sense yea. Still, I think it would look weird for a player to pick a male Templar and then read the "dreaming of being a princess" part in the backstory.  :P

 

There is really nothing weird about it.  Just because some other Templar dreamed of being a princess doesn't mean you did.

 

But yea, I'm sure you are not the only one thinking that the back-story applies to your character if you pick that archetype--- that you are playing that character as opposed to another that shares the same archetype with it.


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There is really nothing weird about it.  Just because some other Templar dreamed of being a princess doesn't mean you did.

 

But yea, I'm sure you are not the only one thinking that the back-story applies to your character if you pick that archetype--- that you are playing that character as opposed to another that shares the same archetype with it.

 

Your interpretation might be accurate on what the backstories are, but probably doesn't reflect how new players will perceive it. Some players base their choice of character on the information available, and for Crowfall, the backstory is an important element of decision, along with stats and appearance.

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Most games have a similar sample narrative accompanying character classes. (Who could ever forget "I'm a bad boy, but you have to be to survive the streets"?)

 

Usually they choose a single gender to front that class selection, so the sample narrative naturally falls in line with this gender (and in cases where there is a single story, in canon the character is that gender. i.e. canonically the DIII Crusader is female, but you can still play a male Crusader). Typically, the sample/default characters are mostly male with one or two females thrown in, but ACE has been superb at providing a balanced mix of default/sample genders.

Edited by Anhasia

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