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Dual/Quad channel memory

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Have you tried running one stick at a time?

 

If you end up returning the RAM, go for 4x2GB instead of 2x4GB. Always aim to fill the slots if you're running the maximum amount of memory. You'll increase the potential bandwidth to your RAM.

 

EDIT: After doing some research, this apparently isn't the case anymore because four ram sticks "puts too much strain on the memory controller." They don't make 'em like they used to, I guess. Stay with 2x4GB.

Edited by txteclipse

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Have you tried running one stick at a time?

 

If you end up returning the RAM, go for 4x2GB instead of 2x4GB. Always aim to fill the slots if you're running the maximum amount of memory. You'll increase the potential bandwidth to your RAM.

 

What? No.


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Have you tried running one stick at a time?

 

If you end up returning the RAM, go for 4x2GB instead of 2x4GB. Always aim to fill the slots if you're running the maximum amount of memory. You'll increase the potential bandwidth to your RAM.

 

EDIT: After doing some research, this apparently isn't the case anymore because four ram sticks "puts too much strain on the memory controller." They don't make 'em like they used to, I guess. Stay with 2x4GB.

 

Unless you run a motherboard designed to handle it.  When you pick up motherboards you should look at the quality of the Northbridge (The great linker) that allows everything to communicate with each other.  Within the north bridge lies the memory controller.

 

Make sure when you check the make of the CPU as to what types of RAM it supports.

Then look at the motherboard RAM speed support.  Whatever it says is the maximum speed of RAM it supports;  (e.g. 1333Mhz or 2133Mhz, etc.)

 

Two things which are most important in purchasing the motherboard is the quality of the Northbridge, the bandwidth to the Southbridge (which links to the slots where your graphics card is connected to) and your capacitors (although bad caps is a kind of thing of the past nowadays).

 

-edit-

Wooops Forgot that the Southbridge isn't important anymore as Graphics Cards are connected to the Northbridge via PCI-Express and it's successors, gah ... my brain is stuck in the 90s.

Edited by Psyctooth

My hubris is the size of a 2 by 4 nailed to the side of a YF-12 jet barrel rolling into a volcano piloted by a Tyrannosaurus Rex.

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well you can run 4 sticks if you have quad channel, but i have dual channel. i tried one stick at a time, nothing. the max mhz my board was able to do was 1066 which is the freq i made sure to get the ram at. But for some reason, i've got ram in there now from crucial that runs at 10600. But yet the g-skills don't work....

 

 

and those wonderful people sent me a RMA when I asked them for tech support. Apparently they couldn't be bothered with my noobiness.

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Have you tried running one stick at a time?

 

If you end up returning the RAM, go for 4x2GB instead of 2x4GB. Always aim to fill the slots if you're running the maximum amount of memory. You'll increase the potential bandwidth to your RAM.

 

EDIT: After doing some research, this apparently isn't the case anymore because four ram sticks "puts too much strain on the memory controller." They don't make 'em like they used to, I guess. Stay with 2x4GB.

It depends on the amount of channel support on your motherboard. x79 chipset motherboards have dual channel support, further additions wont increase bandwith, x99 motherboards have quad channel support.

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A lot of older boards back in DDR1-2 days once you go to 4 dimms the max speed the ram could do drops.

 

For example back in DDR1 days my ASUS board could run all 4 dimms at 400 MHz no prob. When that board died the cheaper board I got could only run 2 dimms at full speed.

Same happens with ddr2. I've seen friends pcs who w 2 dimms could run 800mhz/1066mhz. Once you go to 4 dimms the machines either beep w memory errors or could only run the 4 dimms at 667mhz. All depends on board/chipset/quality/ram brand. They make those approved lists for a reason.

 

Another example is back in DDR2 days a lot of dells said they could only handle 4 gigs max (4x1gb) but most could handle 8 gb of 533/667. If you put in 800 MHz Ram it wouldn't post.

 

Unless you are huge multitasker who needs tons of memory, just go for 2 bigger dimms, rather then 4 smaller dimms. Plus the ability to run ram in 1T vs 2T command rate goes down once you hit 4 dimms.

 

Kinda like video cards you better off with one good card then 2 slower cards cross fired or SLI....just a compatibility/driver thing. Less likely to have issues.

Edited by mendoza

I turn dough into $$$ .....The Pizza King of QFT

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